Eros in dreams

When was the last time you were mesmerized by somebody who took your breath away?

Eros is in the heart of every dream. I know that is a very romantic thought. When I interviewed Bart Koet about his book Spirituality and I suggested that maybe god, in the form of spirituality, is a part of every dream.


He did not agree with me. Some dreams are spiritual dreams other dreams are not.. But still I feel there is truth in the notion Jeremy Taylor once proclaimed:  “But the dream comes always in the service of health and wholeness, of the best and most complete and most creative being that we can be ”

Eros as Dionysos

“The cave is, traditionally, the location of Dionysos’ cult; the serpent, according to Kerenyi, is a life phenomenon, whose coolness, mobility, slippery character and, frequently, deathly threat, cause a highly ambivalent impression. The snake also represents the identity of Zoe, indestructible life, in its lowest form. The earth’s sun, from the depths, is Dionysos himself, “the light of Zeus”. Jung emphasized, in the corrected draft, the references about the Orphic representation of a stream of mud in the underworld.

The Orphics worshipped the first Dionysos (Zagreus), who was dismembered by the Titans. Zeus recovered his heart, and gave it to Semele in a drink, so that she would gestate it. With her death, Zeus placed Dionysos on his thigh, and from that the god was born, the second Dionysos -hence he is considered the god of death and rebirth. To protect him from Hera’s fury, Hermes gave him to Ino, who, together with her husband, King Atamas, raised Dionysos as a girl. His capacity to move between the world of genders is attributed to his living among women, thus he is seen as an androgynous god, in the sense of being able to integrate both masculine and feminine elements in his personality.

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Eros/Phanos

Unlike Apollo, the sun-god, representative of culture and civilization, Dionysos is associated with the mysteries of life and death, with vegetation, with consciousness associated with the depths, irrationality, a life fully lived, the emotions and sensuality that lead to an altered state of consciousness, and to transcendence through experience. Dionysos is considered the god of ecstasy and of enthusiasm, because his devotees, after a frenzied dance, “become enraptured”, and then “the god merges into his adorer, through enthusiasm”.

The Eros/Phanos picture was the target picture of the psiber conference orginized by the IASD. It is an online conference were people can read about psi- connections in dreams. And I do not consider it coincidence that I was reading the book about Jung his love life at the same time this image was selected as target picture!

This quotation I read in Maria Helena Guerra her book “The love drama of C.G. Jung”:

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The love drama of C.G. Jung

This book is very much worth reading. (If you want to buy it just click on the link and go to Amazon, that way you will support Mindfunda). Maria weaves the strings of Jung’s process of constructing the Self in a web of the love triangle that was created after Jung introduced Tony Wolff into his home. She was his lover, his therapist, the one that kept him sane. She was the manifestation of his anima.

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Tony Wolff

Eros as anima

This was Jung his dream:
In the dream I found myself in a magnificent Italian loggia with pillars, a marble floor and a marble balustrade. I was sitting on a gold Renaissance chair. in front of me was a table of rare beauty. It was made of green stone like emerald. There I sat, looking at a distance, for the loggia was set high up on the tower castle. My children were sitting at the table too.
Suddenly a white bird descended, a small sea-gull or a dove. Gracefully came to rest on the table, and I signed the children to be still so that they would not frighten away the pretty white bird. Immediately, the dove was transformed into a little girl ], about eight years of age, with golden blond hair. She ran off with the children and played with them among the colonnades of the castle.
I remained lost in thought, musing about what I had just experienced. The little girl returned and tenderly placed her arms around my neck. Then she suddenly vanished, the dove was back and spoke in a human voice: “Only in the first hours of the night can I transform myself to a human being, while the male dove is busy with the twelve death”. then she flew off into the blue air and I awoke”.

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The dove as symbol of the anima

 

Eros in your life

How about you? When was the last time you were mesmerized by somebody who took your breath away? In your dreams? Or in your waking life?

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Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being.

Soon I will be interviewing Kate Adams and Bart Koet about their book Dreams and Spirituality.

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Evan Thompson: Waking, Dreaming, Being

Susanne van Doorn from Mindfunda interviewed philosopher Evan Thompson about his book ‘Waking, Dreaming, Being’. Evan Thompson builds a bridge between Western science: neurology and the oldest map of consciousness, Upanishad.

A big thanks to Christian Gerike for alerting me to this book, and to Christoph Grassmann, for sharing his presentation about the self in dreaming with me so I could prepare questions for this interview.

Evan Thompson talks to Mindfunda about:

  • How his father William Irwin Thompson founder of Lindisfarne Association, as well as his wife, neurologist Rebecca Todd, influenced the ideas he proposes in this book.
  • The waking state as a stream of consciousness with gaps in-between.
  • The dreaming state and especially lucid dreaming is a special kind of awareness.
  • Dreaming as more than random neurological chatter of the brain.
  • A state of pure awareness.
  • And finally Evan Thompson tells us why he picked up the pen to write Waking, Dreaming, Being.

I got aware of ‘Dreaming, Waking, Being’ because of a quote colleague Christian Gerike put on Facebook. It was this quote:

The first quarter is the waking state. Here consciousness turns outward and experiences the physical body as the self. Waking consciousness takes enjoyment in the ‘gross’ objects of sense perception, yet no object holds its interest for long, because attention, motivated by desire, constantly flits from one thing to another. Consciousness in the waking state is restless, dissatisfied, and constantly on the move.

~ Evan Thompson. ‘Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and consciousness in neuroscience, meditation, and philosophy.’ 2015, p. 9. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Evan Thompson
Waking, Dreaming, Being
Evan Thompson

Needless to say I was fascinated. I got myself a copy of the book and enjoyed the book very much. Being diabetic, and having experienced a coma when I was a young child I always have had a fascination about consciousness. What had happened to “me” in that coma? I was not there but I still had flashes of memory.
I considered the voice in my head as my I, my concept of self. That little voice that whispers to me when my blood sugar is low: “Susanne you are not seeing well, it is time to measure your blood sugar level”.

Reading ‘Waking, Sleeping, Being’ and talking to Evan Thompson gave me a new framework for my concept of self. Evan suggests that there are four states of awareness: the waking state, the dreaming state, dreamless sleep and a state of pure awareness.

Waking State

William James was one of the first psychologists and he coined the term “stream of consciousness”. The latest neurological research indicates that this stream is not continuous. it is filled with gaps. Evan talks about what could happen during such a gap and why understanding this is an important step towards understanding consciousness.

The waking state is a creator of the concept of self. Phenomenologists call them the “self-as-object”: a third person perspective, and the “self-as-subject”: me being aware of myself.  This I and Me perspective carry over to dreaming.

Dreaming state

Christoph Grassmann wrote a very interesting presentation about this for one of the psiberconferences organized by the IASD. Christoph was so kind to give me his presentation to prepare for this interview and that is why I asked Evan Thompson the question how his own sense of self had evolved during the process of writing the book. Evan told me that he had become more experienced in lucid dreaming. Lucid dreaming had made him able to change his perspective on his sense of self because he was able to change processes and experiment in lucid dreams. In fact, a lucid dream inspired him to dive into the poems of the Upanishad and compare them with the latest scientific research about consciousness. He had that dream in Dharmsala, where he was invited to speak for a Mind and Life Institute conference with the Dalai Lama and Western neuroscientists on how experience can change the brain.

“I’ve always wanted, since I was a kid, to catch the exact moment when sleep arrives and notice when I begin to dream. With the rising and falling of my breath, colored shapes start to float on the inside of my eyelids. They hover just beyond my gaze, turning into cows and shacks and mules, like the ones I saw this morning on the bus ride up the mountain. As I watch these images, trying not to tamper with them so they don’t fall apart, I find myself thinking of how Jean Paul Sartre explains pre sleep in his book The Imaginary, which we read in my philosophy class a week before I left for India. When we are conscious of drifting of to sleep, Sartre says, we delay the process and create a peculiar state of consciousness, and from them we fashion images -but these shift with each eye movement and refuse to settle into dreams.
The next thing I know, I’m flying over a large, tree-filled valley. I must be dreaming, I tell myself. From the memory of trying to watch myself fall asleep –  still fresh in the dream- and the lack of memory for what came after, I realize I must have lost awareness during my drowsy reverie and reawakened in the dream. I’m having a lucid dream -the kind of dream where you know that you are dreaming. Indian and Tibetan traditions say that meditating in the lucid dream state can make it easier to see the consciousness beneath waking and dreaming, so I try to sit cross-legged and meditate. But my intention to sit this way won’t translate into action and I wind up kneeling instead. Then I lose the intention entirely and I am flying again, still aware that I am dreaming…”

Evan Thompson – ‘Waking Dreaming Being’  p 108

DReaming as more than neurological chatter

After all his research Evan Thompson is convinced that dreaming is more than random neurological firing from the brain. ‘Waking, Dreaming, Being’ gives us a framework to sharpen our mind. The framework that is handed to you as reader provokes your mind to think and rethink about your concept of self, your dreaming self and your memories. Any book that can do that is worth reading.
The science combined with the magic we all crave, magic that seems to be lost in our rational worlds is just what the doctor ordered.

 

watch the interview with Evan Thompson
Watch the interview with Evan Thompson (YouTube – 30min)

Watch the interview (30 min)

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Soon I will be interviewing Kate Adams and Bart Koet about their book Dreams and Spirituality.

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Healing and Breakthroughs with Archetypes, Art, & Poetry

Several years ago I had a chance to get a tarot reading from Sherry Puricelli. It gave the dream that I discussed with her so much more meaning. It was a dream that bothered me a bit because in my dream I could not get forward. And after Sherry had guided me by asking questions and consulting the tarot I really felt that the message of the dream was something that I needed to hear at that time in my life. Besides being a very good dream coach Sherry also writes moving poems. I am so glad she decided to bring all the goodness she has to offer in this guest blog for Mindfunda.
healing
Sherry Puricelli
Sherry Puricelli, MHA, M.Div. is a Dream Coach and owner of AwakeNDream, LLC. in Madison, Connecticut. She specializes in empowering individuals to recognize and activate archetypal themes to aid in personal healing and breakthroughs. She facilitates specialized retreats, workshops, group and individual sessions. Sherry is the IASD Regional Representative for Connecticut.

 

 

Healing: recognizing archetypes

I’ve heard it said that life can break us or we can break through. Well, I’ve found a tool that helps me break through. Being a dreamer, noticing archetypal themes has always come naturally to me. Over time, I began to perceive repetition and overlap between my dreams, my waking life, and my meditations  / contemplations. I observed that archetypal themes seem to weave in and out of my life or I weave in and out of the archetypal themes or perhaps it’s both. At any rate, I can’t imagine my life without the enrichment, healing, and breakthroughs I’ve experienced by recognizing and living deeply profound themes.

Archetypal themes have even more power when I express them artistically. The creative process forces me to slow down so I don’t just skim the surface. Instead, I plunge right in, living and breathing the archetypes. I’ve noticed that each archetypal theme has an inherent challenge, so I attempt to stay with it until I’ve gotten through that challenge, all the way through it, so I can reflect and absorb the insights and lessons learned. I appreciate that each archetypal theme has gifts, lessons, and new awareness.

Healing and poems

As I participate in the creative process, I’m taken to a whole new level. The theme becomes multi-sensory, visceral, and I feel it in my bones. When I create the digital art, I attempt to include at least one photo of an image present when I was experiencing the archetypal theme. I imagine that the energy is real, it’s tangible, living and breathing. If this hypothesis is true, the digital image carries that actual energy, so the person seeing it has the opportunity to experience the energy of the breakthrough and to hold that breakthrough energy in his/her hands.

And what if there’s more? I love poetry. I write poetry for each of the archetypal themes as I’m experiencing it. The magic of poetry is that it helps me deeply feel the emotional content of the archetypal theme. When I write the poetry I attempt to embody each of the predominant emotions I felt as I was experiencing the archetypal theme in my dreams and waking life synchronicities. I ascertain that poetry carries the energy blueprint of the emotional breakthrough.

Used together, with art and poetry, imagine the possibilities. If we’re in need of healing, we hold healing energy in our hands, we work with it, we sleep with it, we dream with it, and we meditate with it as needed until our energy has shifted.

In the meantime, our senses are heightened, we experience life more fully, and we see the many connections and patterns in our lives. This mindset opens us up to choice. We are not victims of circumstance when we recognize and utilize our choices. We’re empowered to boldly engage in the life we make for ourselves. We hold the power to heal. We hold the power to break through.

Enjoy the Healing power of “Mother

healing
copyright Sherry Puricelli

Mother of cycles, 
you are eternal Home to me; 
sisters, aunts, mothers, grandmothers,
you’re there for me, always – no matter how far away I fly;
Mother Mary, Mother Earth, Mother of Galaxies, 
Mother in my dreams,
you continually cycle back to me…
bringing me home, dancing me home, singing me home, 
with empathy, painted – with colorful drops of Mother.

When I can’t keep up,
or cannot make the climb, you are the charger of my soul;
when I fall,
you bleed, and reveal your scar so I can learn self-healing;
when I lay broken,
you show me flowers that broke open too,
erupting into gardens of inner beauty;
whenever I call,
Mother in my dreams,
you continually cycle back to me…
bringing me home, dancing me home, singing me home,
with empathy, painted – with colorful drops of Gaia.

When my heart is heavy,
you carry my sorrows and you become my rock;
when I’m missing you,
I hear your lullaby in the mourning doves’ cry;
when I am lost,
your evening star twinkles my inspiration trail;
when I lack faith,
you are my monument, my altar, my prayer,
so I can rediscover my inner temple.
Mother in my dreams,
you continually cycle back to me..
bringing me home, dancing me home, singing me home,
with empathy, painted – with colorful drops of Mary.

Mother of cycles,
you are eternal Home to me;
in the theatre of our mutual dream,
I have buried your key;
we’re dancing rainbows
in timeless time,
spaceless space,
and deathless death;
you’ve been with me always,
since before my first lullaby,
and after my last step.

I am Mother in my dreams,
continually cycling back …
bringing me home, dancing me home, singing me home,
with empathy, painted – with colorful drops of Me.

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Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Soon I will be interviewing Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being

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Psychology professor Stanley Krippner about dreams myths and visions

psychology
Stanley Krippner

Mindfunda had the honor of interviewing Stanley Krippner, professor in psychology on Saybrook University about his life. You can watch it on my YouTube channel. Don’t forget to sign up because I will be uploading lots of interesting interviews.

Stanley Krippner is a featured speaker on the conference of the International Study for the Association of dreams (IASD) where he will be talking about his work on ptsd – post traumatic stress disorder -. *)

It was a dream of mine that triggered me to sent him an invitation for an interview. I dreamed that I was performing a ritual with my hands. I had to move my hands in synch with Stanley Krippner in my dream. I knew exactly what to do, intuitively and I woke up very happy. With a new sense of trusting my inner self.

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Stanley Krippner A life of dreams, myths and visions

If you purchase this book using this link, you will support the good work of Mindfunda

In this book Stanley Krippner, a life of dreams myths &  visions, a picture is painted of a psychology professor who combines a very analytical skill with tact and diplomacy. A rare combination. A lot of well-known scholars contributed a chapter to this book: Allan Leslie Combs, Jurgen Werner. Michael Winkerman, Charles Laughlin, Jean Millay & Suzanne Engelman, Deidre Barret, Daniel Deslaudiers, Faribah Bogzahran, David Feinstein and Deidre Barrett to name a few. This book is filled with wisdom.

Stanley Krippner has explored the field of psychology in all possible realms. He has a special interest in dreams. He has kept a dream journal from a relative young age. His article about how the magnetism of the earth influences dream content is just one of the ways he shows his love for the earth. Growing up in a farmer’s family he was involved in ecological agriculture at an early age. Slug the Bug! was his first ecological product that he sold himself at the local market. He always is very aware of his connection to the earth. His advice to students of psychology is: to stay grounded

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@nldreamtime

This connection to the earth must get nurtured by a believe in magic. In the Mindfunda interview Stanley Krippner talks about how his good friend Rolling Thunder surprised him with some magic. One day a bird was brought to Rolling Thunder, a Cherokee medicine man. His wing was broken. Rolling thunder just took the bird in his hands and it flew away, healed.

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Rolling thunder

If you buy this book using this link you will support the good work of Mindfunda 

In the Mindfunda interview you will hear Stanley Krippner talking about that event. The picture on the cover of the book was taken shortly after.

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photo @zoom.nl

The interview with Stanley Krippner made perfectly clear that psychology needs grounded people who base their conclusions on observable facts. But that only observable facts are not enough. You have to be open-minded for the magic to do its work. Otherwise the earthly facts would be too dry to consume.

His knowledge about magic (he used to study and perform magic tricks) came into good use when he investigated several paranormal events. A haunted house got analyzed by Stanley who deducted that every time something happened the grandson of the couple that lived in this haunted house was present. It turned out that the grandson wanted a place of his own and creating a story about the house being haunted made people crazy enough to experience weird things.
Magic also played a role when he conducted his experiments with Montague Ullman and Alan Vaughan concerning dream telepathy. The laboratory where he investigated dreaming persons using electrodes to measure their brainwaves was checked by magicians. It are those kind of details that make this man stand out.

I know Stanley Krippner not only from the books he has written but also because I invited him to perform a workshop Personal Mythology in the Netherlands. In the Mindfunda interview Stanley says that finding out your Personal mythology is important. Getting to know yourself better is vital for liking yourself. Liking yourself creates inner peace. inner peace creates the ability to give back to the world. If you want to join the Facebook group Personal Mythology I initiated click here. In this group we talk about mythology, mythological themes that penetrate our lives, we talk about dreams and how we have evolved from old personal mythologies into new mythologies.

There is one thing I have not mentioned yet. Shamanism. Deidre Barrett, in her contribution to the book “Every Tribe’s Wise man” talks about how a supervisee, Amaro Laria found shamans in remote places who all asked him once they heard he was from America: “Do you know Stanley Krippner?”

Stanley talks in the Mindfunda interview about how he used Carlos Casteneda’s hand method to aquire the art of lucid dreaming (for more info about lucid dreaming see my interview with Robert Waggoner).
Like Ralph Metzner he researched and experienced natural means of expanding consciousness and has written several articles about it.

Stanley Krippner gives psychology a new two-sided face. On the one hand he is about facts: analyzing data, reading the latest research. On the other hand he always keeps an eye open for magic. “The one thing I wish that students would do is gather facts about precognitive dreams” he stated in one of the interviews I saw while preparing my Mindfunda interview. Facts, sprinkled with a little touch of magic.

psychology
Post-traumatic stress disorder

*)  purchase this book about PTSD, and support the good work of Mindfunda

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Mandorla, a way to see the other side of the coin

"The message is unmistakable
our own healing proceeds from that overlap
of what we call good and evil, light and dark. It is not that 
the light element alone does the healing, the place where 
light and dark begin to touch is where miracles arise.
This middle place is the mandorla"
Robert A. Johnson
mandorla
Jean Raffa

I had the pleasure of interviewing author Jean Benedict Raffa about her book “Healing the sacred Divide”. You can watch it on the Mindfunda YouTube-channel. Jean is a keynote speaker at the annual conference of the International Association of Dreams (IASD). Healing the sacred divide got the Wilbur Award,  recognizing excellence in the communication of religious issues.

Jean and I talked about how in this day and age we seem to be addicted to war. Inner disagreements and outer arguments where we seek and emphasize the differences between ourselves and “the other”.

In a previous interview I had with Ralph Metzner, I discussed how Europe was taken over by warrior tribes and how this inheritance changed mythology. Jean Raffa describes how our religion is based on those old warrior mythologies. Masculine, with a God image outside of us. Her book Healing the sacred divide is divided in two parts, just like a mandorla.

mandorla
Healing the sacred divide

If you purchase the book using this link, you will support the good work of Mindfunda

Mandorla consciousness #1

The first part tells about the eight mistakes in our current concept of God. This part analysis how culture has emphasized one part of the continuum: creating a masculine God, that is outside of us and that really lacks a female touch. With female I mean the qualities our culture has marked feminine like empathy, intuition, acting based on an inner knowing instead of facts. Qualities that both male and female posses and express. It is a clear statement how we need both sides: we need to combine facts with intuitive insights.

Mandorla consciousness #2

The second part tells about the nine wisdom gifts of integrating the divided God image. She builds up the second mandala of consciousness fout of nine stones of wisdom. A nine folded lapis lazuli. Holistic consciousness, transforming light, acceptance of the shadow, emotional integrity, partnership, balance, sovereignty, meaning and the mandorla consciousness.

Mandorla consciousness #3

In the interview Jean Raffa shares a dream about her shadow that she has never shared before. It is a clear example of how valuable working with dreams can be. To out value on your dream images is a sure step towards more inner peace and acceptance. Like Robert Waggoner explained to us in his interview with me about Lucid dreaming plain and simple: dreams can provide key insights towards integrating your own shadow. those parts of yourself you are used to project on somebody else.

Mandorla consciousness #4

In the interview Jean Raffa told me that the key to a happy live is the ability to unite opposites. Her book holds valuable keys to make that work much easier. I wish I read this book years earlier. It would have saved me a lot of pain and mistakes. But then again, I might have missed out on a lot of wisdom…

Other Books from Jean Benedict Raffa:

Dream Theaters of the soul (clck the image for the kindle version)
What are your dreams telling you? Dr. Raffa believes that “dreams show us who we are and what we can become.” In this fascinating book of how to analyze dreams, explore the feminine aspects, and use dreams to grow emotionally and spiritually, Raffa combines the metaphor of a theatre with the practicality of a handbook to provide a practical guide to understanding your dreams.

mandorla
Dream theaters of the soul kindle version

 

mandorla
Bridge to wholeness

Bridge to Wholeness, ” describes an inner feminine way where one makes peace with dragons instead of fighting them. This moving account of a mythic journey from humility to strength, through darkness to light, carries a powerful message of unity and balance for seekers everywhere.”

 

If you purchase the book using this link, you will support the good work of Mindfunda

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PS:

Watch the complete interview here. Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner. I got an interview with Stanley Krippner coming up soon!

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Improve dream recall: 10 easy suggestions

dream recall

Some people think they never dream. But we all do, each night. What can you do to improve dream recall?

Improve dream recall tip #1

Take some vitamin C , magnesium and B before sleeping. This helps your body to build tryptophan, an essential amino acid. It has to be part of our diet. It helps your body to make serotonin, that not only reduces aggression but can be transformed into melatonin. In this process of making tryptophan magnesium and vitamin B and C are needed. Please do not only take vitamin B6, as is often recommended because the B vitamins really need each other.

Improve dream recall tip #2

During the day, several times make a resolution that you are going to remember your dreams. “Tonight I will remember my dreams and I will know what they mean”. For me this little trick has proven to be a success many times.

Improve dream recall tip #3

Set your alarm clock 5 minutes early. You can now take the time to lay in bed and ask: “What was I doing” and try to walk your way back into your dreams. This happens to me nearly every morning, for me it is a very successful way.

Improve dream recall tip #4

Lie in bed in the same position as you awoke and make an effort to remember your dream. If there is no memory, ask yourself how you feel. Dreams are about emotions, and your emotions can lead you back into your dream.

Improve dream recall tip #5

If there is no memory you might want to take another position in your bed and see if this brings back a memory.

Improve dream recall tip #6

Take a shower in the morning and make your mind as blank as possible. While relaxing, often ideas and dream memories surface.

Improve dream recall tip #7

Write up a story as if it where a dream. Write a story in the morning (or use an app as Dragon: it writes down what you speak) and treat it as if it was a dream you had that night. This way you are creating a habit that will probably increase your dream memories. We are creatures of habit.

Improve dream recall tip #8

Join a group of dreamers, online or offline. The IASD (International Association of the Study of Dreams) is a very good organization where you can find a lot of dreamers, (some professional) and join a real life group or an internet group. Dreaming together will increase your dream recall.

Improve dream recall tip #9

Read a lot of dream books. What you are doing all day will linger in your mind at night. I have written two nice books about dream as well. One about dreaming and health. This book tells about a thirty year study of a Russian psychiatrist Vasily Kasatkin (Here is a link for Dutch people) about the relation between health and dreams.

I also wrote a book about dreaming about our deceased.

 improve dream recall
A dreamers guide through the land of the deceased

In this book I look at our dream stories using them as a guide map to uncover the “journey” our deceased make after their death, according to our dreams.

Improve dream recall tip #10

Make a dream journal. You can by a nice book to write in, or download an app like Evernote that enables you to add photo’s and drawings when you are using an Android phone or tabloid. I usually write text on the right side of the book, and use the left side to make notes and to write what I did the evening before I had the dream.

What does my dream mean?

Imagine this: you have a dream. An actual dream not a phantasy about how life could be. Now you want to know What does my dream mean?. This article will give you a head start.

What does my dream mean?

Question-Mark
What does my dream mean?

 

First of all there are, in general, four ways of looking at a dream: dreams as “messages from the gods”, dreams as signs from the body, dreams as random neurological chit-chat from the brain and (my personal favorite) dreams as an invitation to get creative. I explore this subject into depth in this post.
If you look at the history of dream sharing and dream interpretation the first category was the most popular.

In “An Encyclopedia of Shamanism” Volume 1, Christina Prati shares with us: Traditionally, shamans and “grandmothers” were the respected specialists in dream interpretation and enactment. The most frequently consulted dream interpreters were the “grandmothers”, older women past menopause  who were respected faith keepers and clairvoyants. Traditionally, they might use scrying with water or fire to help divine and clarify the meaning of the dream”.

In the 20th century, Jung and Freud wanted to use  the “New divinity” that emerged scientific. They wanted to study the “divine messages” given in the dream and interpret them through scientific methods they emperically developed. Like the ancient grandmothers, they interpreted the dream for you. All you had to do was to relax on a sofa and listen to your doctor, who told answered for you the question: “what does my dream mean?”

Now it is very common to tell a dreamer that he/she is the only one that can interpret his own dream. I remember how disappointed I felt when a friend told me this. I had no clue how to start. Let me take you back in time again to explain how this “you are the only one that can explain your dream” originated from those therapist that told you what your dream meant. There was a lot of emancipation going on. The therapists of the old days were the authorities, but in the 70’s of last century much more people could attend college. And a lot of them became therapists. Now what is meant by: “you are the only one that can interpret your dreams?”

First: write down your dream. it will give you the opportunity to distance yourself from the story. A distance that you need to clearly analyse the story.
Second: write down all the symbols of your dream story. Everything that stands out, everything that does not stand out, everything that has emotion in it.
Step three: look at the list and write down the first thing that jumps in your mind.
Step four: re-write the dream with those associations and see what this story has to tell you.

This is just one way of looking at dreams. If you are ready for some advanced methods you can read this article. Of course I know there are a lot of other ways to look at dreams. I am not against looking in dream dictionaries. If a dream dictionary gives you another idea about a dream, then that is perfectly alright. Anything you do with a dream that enhances your creative thoughts, anything that gives you a different perspective on who you are and on what you can be is a gift. The gift of the dream.

 


THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independant site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Dreamfunda:  
Everything you need to know about dreams. Practical How to’s, the latest scientific research, the most commonly used ways to attach meaning to dreams. This and more is given to you for your everyday use in this part of Mindfunda

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


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Are you able to dream about the health of another person?

This is the first Mindfunda Podcast: a panel about Dreaming and Health that I presented together with Patricia Garfield, Paul Overman and Sandy Sederberg Ginsberg. Patricia Garfield was one of the founders of The International Association for the Study of dreams (IASD) . Each year the IASD organizes a conference about dreams. This panel was part of the IASD Conference in Berkeley.

It turned out to be a fascinating discussion with the audience attending. A lot of questions where raised and we tried to answer them as best as we could.
An intriguing question was: “Am I able to dream about the health of another person“. I think you can.  Parents have an innate ability to have precognitive warnings about the health of their children.
Click here to listen to the Dream and Health panel:

 

My presentation was about the book: A theory about dreams written by Vasily Kasatkin. You can look at my prezi while you listen to the presentation. The connection between dreams and health is an acient one. In the ’60s there was the cold war which divided East and West. In the West, Bob van de Castle did research about dreams and health and in the East Vasily Kasatkin was writing about a long term scientific research about dreams and health:

Dreaming and health
Theory about dreams. A book about dreaming and health

 

Patricia Garfield was the next presenter. She told the audience how dreams help her on all important fronts of her life, and also regarding health. Once when she was mis-diagnosed after hurting her arm she had to be in the hospital and that gave her enough inspiration to write “The Healing Power of dreams”. She talked about how her dreams still give her insights and clues how to keep her body in the best condition possible.

Paul Overman, the dream listener, gave the Shamanic perspective of dreaming and health. Shamans have always been healers with knowledge about worlds that are hard to encounter for ordinary people. you can see his presentation over here.

Sandy Ginsberg had een empowering story to tell about how dreams guided her through a process of being ill. She makes art, and drawing her dream images gave her a lot of insight into the severity of her condition. Using a Gestalt technique she made the decision to have a surgery. After the surgery the doctor told her it was just in time.