Asian Journals: the Allegory of American Mythologist Joseph Campbell

This Mindfunda Book review is written by Misa Tsuruta, Ph.D.

CampbellI have asked Misa, a Japanese psychologist,to write this review as she is very familiar with Western ways of thinking.Joseph Campbell, a Western man, was very familiar with the Eastern way of thinking. Usually we associate Campbell with the hero myth, but he was very aware of the differences in mythological world perspective between East and West. As a native Japanese inhabitant, Misa provides us with a unique perspective on Campbell's book.
Susanne van Doorn MSc, founder of Mindfunda.com

 

Campbell: Asian Journals, India and Japan

campbell
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Joseph Campbell, renowned for his mythological works, did not have a chance to visit any part of Asia until his 40s, despite his strong, continuing interests in and attraction to Asian religions and cultures. Culture is a hard substance to grasp, whether it is an attempt by the insider (native) or by the outsider (foreigner).

Asian Journals: India and Japan is an edited version of his travel logs.  It was in 1954 that he finally embarked on this journey around the world.  Before, between and after his main destinations India and Japan, he also spent short time in the Middle East, South East Asia, Hawaii and California.

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Like any journey you are exposed to new cultures his was not entirely an easy one either; although he had previously idealized Indian culture through its religions and spirituality, he was so disillusioned with its anti-Americanism and “Baksheesh complex” as he called it that he sustained some sort of mental injuries for a while – until somehow they were cured in Japan.

Campbell’s Journey to Mythology

As a Japanese, I can be complimented by his implying that Japanese culture had such curative power – but to me it appears that one reason was that he finally finished working on Zimmer’s work that he grappled on for a good dozen of years.  Heinrich Zimmer was the scholar who influenced him most.  In short, he was freer in Japan.  His observation was that Japan was more open to westernization and that ancient Asian cultures were somehow better-preserved in this country.  He was rejoiced with both.

While in Japan he played with geisha, attended numerous theatrical performances (Noh, Kabuki, Bunraku, Takarazuka, among others), visited famous temples and shrines, met friends, scholars, and priests, and fiercely studied the Japanese language.

campbell
Art: Shimura Tatsumi

 

Perhaps thanks to his wife Jean Erdman, dancer/choreographer/professor, he had a deep perception of theatrical works.  Jean shared parts of his travel.

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Joseph Campbell and Jean Erdman

In this volume you can encounter Campbell as a prolific writer/scholar and experience how he generated his ideas and organized them.  While reading you will discover many seeds for his later works.
In fact, it was through this indispensable journey that he was able to transform from a professor in comparative religion to a mythologist.

Campbell and Manto-e

One of the culminations of this journey was the visit to Todai-ji Temple in Nara, renowned for its Great Buddha of 54-foot height (Daibutsu).  Luckily he hit the very date of Manto-e, or Ten Thousand Lights Festival.

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Higashi Otani Manto-e Festival (Kyoto, Japan)
Photo copyright by https://imgur.com/user/zazuzazu001

Then a centennial event, according to Campbell, this festival takes place every year in our time, but not in April when he attended but in August.  I could imagine how otherworldly awe-inspiring the Great Buddha was among numerous quivering lights.

It is these unforgetable moments that make people long for coming back to the same place, or leaving for another travel… He also joined Aoi-matsuri (Aoi Festival) in Kyoto and even engaged in a fire-walking on the occasion of Shinran’s (the founder of Shinshu sect) birthday celebration.

Campbell: Asian Journals conclusion

Like many Japanese I like to hear what foreigners think of our culture and country.  In that sense I was very satisfied with his voice from some 60 years ago.

But the world he depicted was a bit foreign to me as well – the travel from Tokyo to Kyoto which takes less than 3 hours now took him some 7 hours and 20 minutes (before the advent of our bullet train Shinkansen), and he strolled in towns where streetcars were running (this method of transportation disappeared around the time I was born).

Magically cultures and traditions survive even though they somewhat change, and I am thankful that this great man of culture and spirituality had a chance or two to visit my country.

Best Books on Dreams 2017

What are the best books on dreams in 2017? And my question to you: what are the most inspiring books about dreams you have never read? Let me know in the comments because I love to get inspired by new books.

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You know I read a lot (I actually mean a LOT). I consider it to be a part of my self-development. I set aside at least one hour each day to immerse myself in the think-pattern of another human being. I taste it, feel it, play with it, sometimes get annoyed about it, sometimes it leaves me hungry for more…

Recently I sent out a mail to several people who I consider to be thought-leaders in their area of expertise, asking them to name me books that had inspired them.

“Let me think about that”, was the response I got from most of them. And a few actually mailed back some good books. And I will share them with you today.

Best books on dreams 2017

Robert Waggoner,  Past president of Th International Association for the study of Dreams, co-editor of the online magazine The Lucid Dreaming Experience

best books on dreams
Robert Waggoner

 

 

 

 

 

Robert says:  “When a distinguished researcher and Professor emeritus of psychology writes a book on dreams that seem clairvoyant, telepathic or precognitive, and research studies that support this, I pay attention.  This is a fascinating, thoughtful and well-written look at what science often refuses to look at, the paranormal dream”.

Robert is talking about the writer Carlyle T Smith. He is Professor Emiritus at Trent University Peterborough, Ontario, Canada and Director of Trent University Sleep Research Laboratories.

“Have you ever had a dream about someone you have not seen or heard from in months or years – and then later the same day you actually run into this person, or they telephone or write? You have had a Heads-Up dream” (from the website Heads Up Dreaming).

 

 

Deirdre Barrett , Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard, past president of the International Association for the Study of Dreams mentions an article instead of best books on dreams.

Deirdre Barrett

 

 

 

 

 

 

This article describes the discovery of the “dream spot“.

In a research of 46 persons the difference in brain activity was measured while dreamers were experiencing dreams in Rem and Non Rem sleep. The article, published in Nature Neuroscience, shows that there is a change in activity in a certain part of the brain called ‘posterior cortical hot zone’.

 

best books on dreams 2017

When waking people up while they had activity in that specific hot zone, no matter if the were in REM or in Non Rem sleep, they were experiencing dreams!

And what could even be more exciting: during wakefulness you also have similar activity in this dream spot. There is thin line between a blurry kind of wakefulness and dreams.

Now there is even more chance for scientists to resolve issues with insomnia or PTSD.

Stanley Krippner, Professor of Psychology on Saybrook University, known for his extensive knowledge of shamanism and mythology

best books on dreams 2017
Stanley Krippner

 

 

 

 

 

told me that he is impressed and inspired by Kelly Bulkely’s book Big Dreams. In his eyes it is one of the best books on dreams.

best books on dreams 2017
Click here to buy the book and support the good work of Mindfunda

Kelly Bulkeley pleads in this book to search for the so called Big Dreams. Those dreams that make a lasting impression and that chance your life.

Dream databases are filled with what I call “HTK’s”: House, Town and Kitchen Dreams. Ordinary dreams. And he wants us, but most of all other researchers to collect and research those big, life changing dreams and analyse them so we can draw conclusions about us, human beings a dreaming species.

Elaine Mansfield, Jungian author and inspirational blogger, who often gets inspired by dreams mentions a dream classic we all know as being the best book on dreams. This book has been on my bedside table for quite a while.

best books on dreams 2017
Elaine Mansfield

 

 

 

 

 

“I’ve done lots of dreamwork with Jungian analyst Robert Bosnak. I’ve also done trauma and healing work with him. His technique of connecting the dreamer deeply with the sensory dream images and embodying the images (rather than interpreting) transforms me every time.

best books on dreams 2017
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My favorite book of his is not new, but I listed it below. I love his technique of Embodied Imagination because you don’t have to be an expert to help a friend or partner with a dream—although it helps to be skilled. It’s about asking questions, slowing down the waking mind, and illuminating the images. Being with the dream. Bosnak’s technique was important in my marriage because it allowed us to do deep work together without stepping on each other’s dream toes”.

Bosnak has been an inspiration for me as well. If I had not been married, I would have sold all my stuff, and gone to America, to start working in his Santa Barbara Healing centre.  Even if he had not paid me (don’t tell him about this, because I like earning enough money to pay my bills), I would have helped and stayed around just as long for him to say: “Hey, that girl needs a job her, let’s sign her up, she’s doing good stuff”.

Another one of his books, the one that changed my way of working with dreams is Tracks in the Wilderness of Dreaming. What this book did for me was to make me aware that there are themes in dreams. Themes that evolve. And that you can  use dreams to carefully monitor how, and if you are changing. Now I have been never cutting up my dreams in words like he suggests but I always like creative suggestions. If you like dreams you’re going to love Tracks in the Wilderness and all the new ideas it has to offer (yes I know the book isn’t exactly new, but the creative ideas within it are timeless).

The Dutch Dreaming Society VSD has a president called John van Rouwendaal. (Did you know we might get another dream conference in the Netherlands in 2019? As we speak (or read) John is making calls, sending emails and coming up with new and creative ideas to make this one of the best conferences ever).

best books on dreams 2017
John van Rouwendaal

 

 

 

 

 

John mentions this as being one of his best books on dreams: Avision the Way of the Dream. “This book was suggested to me on the last Dutch Dream Conference in Rolduc. I have read it and it was very inspiring” he tells me in his mail.

 

best books on dreams 2017
Buy the Book using this link and Support the good work of Mindfunda

 

The author, Anthony Lunt was an advanced student of the psychiatrist R.D.Laing. Laing viewed mental illness as a shamanic process. Quoted from Wikipedia: “For Laing, mental illness could be a transformative episode whereby the process of undergoing mental distress was compared to a shamanic journey”. Anthony’s wife Anna received dreams that she interpreted as an ongoing educational process.

Another inspiring book that John mentions is Dreamtime, an aboriginal Odyssey by Nigel Clayton.

best books on dreams 2017
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It’s a story about myths and legends  about Aboriginal society. It’s only 61 pages and it sounds really like something I would enjoy very much. I might be tempted to buy it and write something about it for Mindfunda.

Susanne van Doorn, Dutch psychologist, blogger & author

best books on dreams
Susanne van Doorn, MSc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I doubted a long time if I would put myself on this list. I know I read a lot, but I am not famous. I do have you, my dear reader who follows me on my path to wisdom and self discovery. So I decided to add myself to the list, in the humble position of being the last one.

One of my definitions of an inspiring book is that you pick it up to read (parts of) it again.  For Mindfunda, I usually review semi-scientific dream books. One of my new favourite best books on dreams is Joseph Campbell’s The Mythic Dimension

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On page 207 (but the rest of the book is also fascinating) Campbell describes the process of kundalini in its ascending phases. I shave read Campbell’s analysis of the energy between Freud and Jung with the enthusiasm of a trembling virgin…

I had always heard that Campbell and Jung did not really get along, but this book sketches another vision.

Besides Jung and Freud, (there are Dream enthusiasts who get real tired about the Freud-Jung thing, even though in my eyes the Jung Freud paradigm represents the science – mythology paradox par excellence. Freud being the “scientific” one who was always out for reason. Jung, the spiritual one, who battled against the role of scientist), this book is filled with stories and mythologies that will make your hungry heart sing.

Mythology, the Goddess, symbolism, mythological themes in art and as a cherry on the pie a whole chapter on erotic irony and mythic forms in the art of Thomas Man. It’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but I love it.

I am currently reading Mutants & Mystics, Science Fiction, Superhero Comics and the Paranormal written by Jeffrey J. Kripal.

I have been reading it, bit by bit, for quite some time now.  It’s pleasant and remarkable. Let me give a quote, about Palmer, an artist/publicist of strip science fiction books:

“Palmer’s first published story, “The Time Ray of Sandra’ in Science Wonder Stories was a classic example of the mytheme of Orientation, that is, it was a time travel story that involved a lost civilisation. He based the details of the landscape he wrote about on one of his many dreams (he claimed he dreamed every night and could remember his dreams in great detail), only to get a letter from a field guide in Africa who had just published a story and was certain the writer was one of the few people whom he had personally guided up the mouth of a river on the Atlantic coast of southwest Africa: the details were all precise. The guide simply did not believe Palmer when the teenager wrote back and confessed he had never been to Africa… If I the dreaming was true, why not the imaging? (page 97)

I promise that I will write a Mindfunda blog about it. I hope you enjoyed my blog, feel free to share and comment: tell me about your favorite books.

Byung Chul Han: Agony of Eros, a Book Review

Byung Chul Han, South Korean professor at the University of Basil, knows about love. It is threatened. Eros is dead.
It is always good to start a book with a cliff hanger…

It was in A.D. 14–37 that the great god Pan was declared death by a sailor called Thamus. He had heard of his death in a divine whisper.

Byung Chul Han
Eros and Pan

With the death of the horned god Pan came the birth of theology.

And now Byung Chul Han, even though he is not sailing on a ship, has heard a similar divine whisper. The great god Eros is dead… And in this book he analysis love in every manifestation possible.

The Agony of Eros” from The MIT Press, published in 2017, originally published as “Agonie des Eros” in the series Fröhliche Wissenschaft by Matthes & Seitz Berlin.

.

 

Byung Chul Han
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In seven chapters love is taken into the box ring. Dragged from depression to powerlessness, to pornography and emptiness, to nowadays superficial consumerism.

But it also triggers your mind. What is love for you? What are your feelings about porn? Is there love in politics?

Byung Chul Han: a Man’s Vision on Eros

 

Byung Chul Han
Portrait of Byung Chul Han
copyright S Fischer Verlag

Byung Chul Han is a man. (I know you start to laugh right now because it is so obvious). And it shows in his analysis and his texts. I can not help but wonder how a female philosopher would have taken on the challenge of the death of Eros.

Do you remember the film Pan’s Labyrinth? It is also a man’s vision on female initiation in a patriarchal society. Nothing would please me more as a woman’s vision on this subject.

Don’t get me wrong. i like this book. A lot. let me explain why in the next paragraph.

Byung Chul Han: The Other

Being a Jungian, I am always pre-occupied with the Self. Byung Chul Han is preoccupied with the Other (written with a capital O just like the Jungian Self is always written with a capital S).

Eros is a relationship to the Other situated beyond achievement, performance, and ability” (page 11).

Byung Chul Han
Cartoon: Rebel Circus

The Other is defined in Lao’s von Trier’s Melancholia how the Other brings you in a state of disbalance…

The Other-ness is also the fuel for erotic attraction between partners. And to fully conceive and appreciate the Otherness a death of the Self is in order. That does remind you of the words of Joseph Campbell, doesn’t it? How he spoke of marriage as death.

The agony of Eros, the depreciation of the value of Otherness, lies in the unification of contemporary society. Or what Byung Chul Han calls:  “the inferno of the same” at every turn .  

Conclusion

This book is not for everybody. It assumes a vast knowledge of philosophers and films that not everybody will have.

But it is an excellent work out for your mental muscles. How does Byung Chul Han differ from Joseph Campbell for example? Joseph Campbell, seems to contradict Byung Chul Han because Jospeh assumed that society in the middle ages had discovered eros. In his interviews with Bill Moyers he talks about how in the 12th century love was re-invented by the troubadours. They spread the word about this new standard for eros and marriage very rapidly.

Byung Chul Han suggests that we now have buried love/eros. In a time with multiple divorces it seems like we have gotten back to pre-medieval times. I certainly hope we have not but what do you think? Let me know in the comments.


THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independent site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Mythofunda:
“Myths are public dreams, dreams are private myths” Joseph Campbell used to say. This part of Mindfunda shows you how your personal mythology can create peace in your life.

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


(Ready for more free Mindfunda content on ‘#MYTHOLOGY‘?

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Joseph Campbell: 5 Secrets to Yield Your own Yoda

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International Woman’s Day: Be Bold for Change

 

Each year on March 8, it’s International Woman’s Day. The theme of 2017 is: Be BOLD for change. And unfortunately, even after so many decades of action, the female principle is still underestimated…

International Woman’s Day: Be Bold for Change

It is not easy to be bold, whether you are born into the male or within the female gender. Everybody wants to be loved and accepted. I have been in tears several times when people criticise things I write on Mindfunda.

Yes, I know that is weak. But it is also a sign for me that I put my heart and soul into these blogs. This is my life’s work so far. My digital footprint that I will leave behind on this earth.

international woman's day
Cartoon: Speedbump.com

 

So how do you do that? Be bold for change? My suggestion: embrace the feminine aspects in your self. In this blog you can read about this journey in more detail.

International Woman’s Day: Embrace the Heroine

 

In 1990, 27 years ago (!!!), Maureen Murdock re-wrote the journey of the hero from Joseph Campbell into the journey of the heroine.

 

international woman's day

You see the first (devastating) step: to separate from the feminine. Every woman will remember that awkward moment when others told her that girls are stupid, or incapable of being good athletes, or inferior in any other way.

“Don’t throw like a girl” my father said and he demonstrated a very clumsy way of throwing a ball.

 

 

international woman's day
Support Mindfunda by clicking here if you want to buy this book

 

I felt embarrassed. I certainly wanted to proof I was better than that. And that embarrassment about being born into the “wrong” gender is still roaming around. After all those years…

 

International Woman’s Day: No Role Models

Understanding why so little has changed in thirty years is not easy at all. But look at this film from Rebel Girl.

international woman's day
Click to see the film

 

As you can see, books do not provide really good role models for girls to take faith into their own hands, and Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls makes an effort to change this.

But as we book lovers found out, people read fewer books. YouTube has taken over the world. (I can recommend my channel: you will learn a lot from all the nice interviews I have uploaded there).

In this visual oriented world, what is a woman to do?

International Woman’s Day: Wear Red

Another Be Bold Initiative is “A Day Without A Woman“. You don’t know what you got till you lose it! If women do not show up for (unpaid) work, their economic power and significance will be highlighted.

 

international woman's day

 

If you dress today, wear the colour red. Red is a color that is associated with revolutionary love and sacrifice.

Let’s honour our inner feminine side, men and women everywhere. Let’s make each other stronger and support the qualities we can give the world.

In the end, it is up to us to make the world an enjoyable place.


THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independant site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Spirifunda:
psychology for everyday with a spiritual layer of meaning, searching for the soul. Our brains are wired for believe in magic. In a world filled with rationality, you sometimes need a little magic, a little “I wonder why”. Synchronicity, the insights of Carl Jung, the mythology used by Freud, the archetypical layers in the Tarot, the wisdom of the I Tjing, Shamanism, the oldest religion of humanity, all that information gets published in the Spirifunda section of Mindfunda.

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


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Joseph Campbell: 5 Secrets to Yield Your own Yoda

This is a Mindfunda book review about “The Mythic Dimension“, a compilation of essays written by Joseph Campbell, dusted off and reprinted in a paperback. It will help you unleash your own inner Yoda.

The Mythic Dimension, Selected Essays 1959-1987
by Joseph Campbell
Edited by Robert Walter & David Kudler
New World Library 2017 ISBN 9781608684915 $13.47

 

joseph campbell
Click here to buy book and support Mindfunda

 

Joseph Campbell: the yoda of george lucas

Joseph Campbell brought mythology to the American people. His interviews with Bill Moyers, broadcasted in 1988 as “the Power of Myth” appealed to people. The easy way Joseph Campbell spoke about myths, compared myths as answers to worldwide challenges of the human race, it hit a core within a lot of people.

 

joseph campbell
Cartoon: Lowe

 

George Lucas, director of the Star Wars episodes, called Campbell his own Yoda. They met in 1984, and Campbell and his wife Jean visited the ranch of Lucas to watch three Star War films. Joseph allegedly said: “‘You know, I thought real art had stopped with Picasso, Joyce, and Mann. Now I know it hasn’t.”

It was George Lucas who introduced Campbell to Moyers and made the interviews of “the Power of Myth” possible.

Unleashing your Yoda by Joseph Campbell tip #1

Everything is a metaphor

It might sound simple, but please don’t shrug your shoulders. Do you know how much your perspective on the world changes once you see everything, including yourself, as a symbol, a part of a greater unity of meaning?

“One of the most effective ways to rediscover in any myth or legend the spiritual ‘tenor’ of its symbolic “vehicles” is to compare it, across the reaches of space, or of time, with homologous forms from other, even greatly differing traditions” (page 201).

If you look at the story of your life and consider yourself a metaphor, which one would it be? What is the first thing that pops up in your mind? Let me know in the comments!

UNLEASHING YOUR YODA BY JOSEPH CAMPBELL TIP #2

There is such a thing as a mythical archetype

We all know archetypes. Images we know universally, like the old wise man. But before I read this book, I had never realised that there are specific archetypes that indicate mythological themes.

Joseph campbell
Image: seanbolton.me on pinterest

 

The Tree of Life is an example of a mythological archetype.

How does this make your life easier you might ask? Well, according to Campbell: “Like life itself, such mythological archetypes simple are” (page 234).

But now you are going to be disgruntled with me. We have uncovered mythological archetypes just to find out we are not supposed to do anything with it. That takes me to tip #3.

UNLEASHING YOUR YODA BY JOSEPH CAMPBELL TIP #3

East is different from West

Thinking that we have to act all the time to change our fates, our lives and turn things around for the better is not always necessary. Campbell clearly distinguishes a difference between East and West.

“Oriental Mythology”: “the rich yet essentially unified major province represented by the philosophical myths and mythological philosophies of India, Southeast Asia, China and Japan-to which should be joined the much earlier yet spiritually related mythological cosmologies of archaic Mesopotamia and Egypt” (page 19).

This mythology assumes a cyclic view on life. “there was never a time when time was not, nor will there be a time when time will have ceased to be”.

 

joseph campbell
Cartoon: Cuyler Black

 

Ha, but now you are going to say (and that why I love you reader): we in the West have adopted an Eastern religion. Yahweh was a god of Israel. An old god who originated in the Iron Age.

The difference between East and West in a mythological sense is in the fact that the Western god is a person, while the Eastern god is and energy.  The Western god is a person that is easily offended, kicks people out of paradise and puts a ward outside to make sure they will never get back in again.

The Eastern religions encourage people to embrace the energies within and enter the paradise, not after death but in waking life. By meditating, by eating certain foods, using certain herbs and acting in specific ways.

So what can we learn from Campbell: put all religion in its historical perspective.

UNLEASHING YOUR YODA BY JOSEPH CAMPBELL TIP #4

Mythology has 4 functions: mystical, cosmological, sociological and psychologic.

The first is a mystical function. 

Mythology reconciles consciousness with the preconditions of its own existence. Life sucks. Good news is: it sucks for everybody, there are no exceptions. Mythology helps you to make sense of the earth, the injustice in this world, it helps you come to terms with the fact that you have to kill to stay alive.

 

joseph campbell

 

The second is a cosmological function. 

Mythology offers an image of the universe and your place in it. “All things should be recognized as parts of a single great holy picture, an icon as it were: the trees, the rocks, the animals, sun, moon, and stars, all opening back to mystery, and thus serving as agencies of the first function, as vehicles and messengers of teaching” (page 220).

The third is a sociological function.

Mythology paints a picture of the cosmos and in doing so they paint your place in it. A mythology serves as a rulebook for social behaviour.

joseph campbell

Think about how in the bible there are the ten commandments of Moses: those are social rules that guide people to live together in relative harmony.

The fourth function of mythology is psychological.

This lies at the root of any myth. Each mythological tale can shape you as a person. Human beings are young relatively long. All of a sudden you are supposed to take care of yourself. You go from a place were you take orders from your parents and follow their rules to a position were you are the one solving the problems.

You have a second social birth: you need to manifest yourself in the world and understand the rules. And those rules are often unwritten. Rules like: greet everyone you meet on the street, don’t offend your boss/husband/wife, laugh when you are the subject of a joke…

UNLEASHING YOUR YODA BY JOSEPH CAMPBELL TIP #5

Dreams are our personal myths

As stated above, mythology has a cosmological function. The cosmos is filled with mysterious energies. Campbell describes it as a “sphere”.  The Dream Consciousness is such a sphere.

“The deities of vision are of this sphere and of the same luminous stuff as dream. Accordingly, the vision and the visionary, though apparently separate, are one, and all the heavens, all the hells, all the gods and demons, all the figures of the mythic worlds, are within us as portions of ourselves -portions that is to say, that are of our deepest primary nature, and thus of our share of nature” (page 212).

So dear Mindfunda reader, dream on!

CONCLUSION

PRO

  • This is a yummy book. Easy to read, enjoyable, entertaining and you will learn a thing or two underway;
  • There is a whole chapter on the Goddess;
  • The first part of the book puts mythology in a historical perspective;
  • The second part of the book puts mythology in a creative perspective;
  • Both perspectives give you new perspectives on mythologies: even when you thought you knew Joseph Campbell by now, this book can be regarded as a groundwork of his whole work.

CON

  • Campbell’s monomyth is a bit dated. Campbell was cherry-picking and constructing his hero myth. He died 33 years ago, mythology has moved on now;
  • The hero story is a male story, it is not particularly tuned into the female gender.

Mindfunda verdict:
8,5/10

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THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independant site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Mythofunda:
“Myths are public dreams, dreams are private myths” Joseph Campbell used to say. This part of Mindfunda shows you how your personal mythology can create peace in your life.

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


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What are the best Spirituality Quotes?

Spirituality Quotes can really inspire you to face problems. Just a simple sentence  can give you goosebumps because it reaches a core of authentic knowledge in your heart. This is the first time that someone finds the right words to capture that wisdom. Why do these quotes give you goosebumps? Because they give an intuitively correct answer to a question. This blog presents some profound spiritual quotes (feel free to share). Please comment: leave your favourite spiritual quote in the comment section and tell why this has inspired you.

Spirituality Quotes #1

“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature”.

Joseph Campbell

 

Spiritual Quotes

Human nature has us searching for the Grail. That thing that makes us feel complete. For our inner fire. Sometimes you think it is a (potential) partner. Sometimes you think it is a job. But deep inside you know that this fire is ignited when you feel that the world sees and appreciates your core values. The question this quote asks is: what lights your fire?

Spirituality Quotes #2

“Art is the indispensable psychical container as well as the inexhaustible vessel of spiritual nourishment”

H.G. Baynes

Spiritual Quotes

In Mindfunda’s Spiritual Soul Searching, you will create a personal Mandala based on your experiences during this course. Because often, it is hard to find the right words to express the feelings of a spiritual experience. If you express yourself through art and analyse the artwork you can easily detect themes you did not notice before. Do you express yourself through art?

For instance: you can reach me through Skype to have an extended dream consultation. In one of these consultations, a woman mailed me her dream with a drawing. When I analysed the drawing, I noticed that some numbers were repeating in the drawing. And those numbers all added significance to the meaning of the dream.

SPIRITUALITY QUOTES #3

“Everything that irritates us about others can lead us to an understanding of ourselves”.

Carl Gustav Jung

One of the things I learned from reading the Red Book is the personal power that you gain once you decide to face your shadow. Facing the shadow is a conscious decision. It takes a certain amount of emotional adulthood and a willingness to look at yourself from another perspective. Do you ever wonder whose perspective do you use when you look at yourself?

SPIRITUALITY QUOTES #4

“The myth is the collective dream of the people”.

Otto Rank

Spirituality Quotes
Unknown artist, picture found on Pinterest

Do you ever wonder what mythological story you are living? Mythology seems so useless in a world driven by rationality. Dreams are a way to reconnect with your own often hidden story. You can be living the story of Persephone, a daughter who could only become a queen when she was stolen away from her mother. You can be living the story of Odysseus, the boy trying to become a man after the war in a foreign country.

Spiritual Quotes #5

“Describe me the dream of a person and I will tell you what illness he suffers from.”

Vasily Kasatkin

Is there a relationship between dreams and health? Can you even dream about the health of another person? I think you can. I have collected several dreams of parents who foresaw health issues of their children in dreams. What are your dreams telling you about your health?

Tell me in the comment what spiritual quote gave you goosebumps. I would love to hear from you.

Join us now! Spiritual Soul Searching, limited offer ends Feb 05 2017

 


THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independant site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Spirifunda:
psychology for everyday with a spiritual layer of meaning, searching for the soul. Our brains are wired for believe in magic. In a world filled with rationality, you sometimes need a little magic, a little “I wonder why”. Synchronicity, the insights of Carl Jung, the mythology used by Freud, the archetypical layers in the Tarot, the wisdom of the I Tjing, Shamanism, the oldest religion of humanity, all that information gets published in the Spirifunda section of Mindfunda.

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


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International Woman’s Day: Be Bold for Change

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Book Review: 11 titles on Mindfunda 2016

Welcome to this years’ list of book review’s that I put on Mindfunda.
At its core, Mindfunda is here to distribute useful information to you. Information that will make your life more fun. In three ways: we offer online courses, we offer book reviews and we offer blogs with information about dreaming, spirituality and mythology.

Do you miss a book? Had you read or written a wonderful book about mythology, spirituality or dreams you want me to review ? Let me know below!

This is the 2016 book review list, that only contains books that were published this year. It starts with the most recent Mindfunda blog post and ends with the oldest post. If you want to buy a book, be so kind to use the affiliate link from Mindfunda. In that way you will support our good work.

book review
art found on CCHunterbooks.com
Book review 2016

Call Of the Cats, What I Learned about Life and Love from a Feral Colony by Andrew Bloomfield. Cats have an uncanny bond with humans. Just as I was offered this for a book review by the publisher, a friend of mine shared a presentation about how her cats had influence her dreaming.

book review
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So you can understand that I had to say yes to this request. The book reads like a psychological novel. If you like cats, be sure to buy this book, you will not be sorry.

A Day in the Life of the Brain by Susan Greenfield. Susan Greenfield describes a day of a normal guy and paints a picture of what happens in his brain.

book review
click here to buy the book

Easy to read, with fascinating chapters on dreaming, and on consciousness in animals.

Sleep Monsters and Superheroes edited by Jean Campbell and Clare Johnson, who both contributed chapters to this book.

Children and dreams… With this book every parent, every teacher, niece, nephew, uncle or aunt has a chance to introduce their children to the magic of dreaming.

book review
click here to buy the book

When I gave dream workshops for pregnant ladies in the beginning of this century, I was visited by so many parents and grandparents asking me how to handle the nightmares of their children. I prepared for the workshop by reading the information that was available on the website of Patricia Garfield. Patricia  Garfield also contributed to this book.  A wealth of information, you can add to your mother-toolkit.

Mythology of the Soul by H.G. Baynes.

A book that combines two things I love: mythology and art. Over 900 pages of information about dreams and Jungian psychology by one of the best Jungian analysts in England.

book review
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If you like dreams, art and Jungian psychology, this is the book for you.

The Power of Ritual by Robbie Davis-Floyd and Charles Laughlin.

Human beings are sensitive to rituals. This book is written in a way that makes you understand the psychological, spiritual and psychical side of ritual.

book review
click here to buy the book

This book researches ritual in every aspect, leaving no stone unturned. It will be so much easier for you to create your own positive rituals after you have read this book.

Translating Myth edited by Ben PestellPietra Palazzolo and Leon Burnett.

Mythology is a cultural concept. Each culture, each century, has its own mythologies. This book has the ambitious quest to offer a translation: from century to century, from continent to continent.

book review
click here to buy the book

 

I really loved all the wisdom and stories packed in this book. It has become the theoretical backbone of my Mindfunda Movies course.

The Goddess and the Shaman by J.A. Kent.

The doors to the realm of the Elphame open through dreams. If you like shamanism as proposed by Micheal Warner, this is the book for you.

 

book review
click here to buy the book

 

It is not a work book however. If you are looking for ways to connect with the inner Goddess you might want to consider the online Mindfunda Mythology Course .

Big Dreams by Kelley Bulkeley.

This book is a plea to look at special dreams and research their characteristics. Lucid dreams, visitation dreams, mutual dreams.

book review
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Only if we look at those special dreams can we come to an understanding of the phenomenon of dreaming, according to Bulkeley. What I like most about this book is the way that Bulkeley effortlessly writes about sophisticated neurological research in an understandable way.

What is Relativity by Jeffrey Bennet.

In the past I had so many time-travel dreams that I had this inner craving to understand more about its possibilities.

book reviews
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This was a very interesting book review. I discovered so much reading this. Not all fun though, because time travel is not possible (my time travel dreams did cease soon thereafter). But if you are crazy about astronomy, if you are a star-gazer, or just Einstein crazy, this is the book for you.

Strange Gods by Susan Jacoby. A book not only about the cruel middle ages. It is still happening, conversions. Religion is intertwined with power and privilege.

book review
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And last but certainly not least: Mythic Worlds, Modern Words by Joseph Campbell, edited by Edmund Epstein.

book review
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Using James Joyce his oeuvre as a guide to the mythological aspects of your challenges.

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The Power of Ritual: Informative and Intriguing

The Power of Ritual
by Robbie Davis Floyd and Charles Laughlin
Daily Grail Publishing, 2016, $26.95 paper, ISBN 978-0-9874224-9-1
Reviewed by Drs. Susanne van Doorn

 

ritual
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the power of ritual: introduction

Do you remember the eighties when Joseph Campbell talked to us about “The Power of Myth”? It was magic on television. His engaging way of telling a story combined with the way he glued it to the challenges of that time, it made us all feel that mythology was very much alive.

Three decades later, authors anthropologist Robbie Davis Floyd Ph.D., and neuroanthropologist Charles Laughlin explore the Power of Ritual.
In the foreword Betty Sue Flowers, editor of “the Power of Myth” says:
“In The Power of Ritual, Robbie Davis-Floyd and Charles D. Laughlin have done for ritual what Campbell did for myth-tell stories, personalize the study of ritual, and relate ritual to the concerns of everyday life”.

 

ritual
Joseph Campbell in the Power of Myth

 

Even though it is not written as a textbook, it has an academic thoroughness about it. It explores all the facets of ritual: the brain of the Homo sapiens, mythology, the “hardware” of ritual: the drivers, the techniques and the place, the “software of ritual: the emotions and the transformations it can sustain in a certain society.

Where myths are the stories that make us come to terms with the world, rituals are a sword with two edges. Ritual helps you make sense of the culture you live in and it can help you change that culture.

the power of ritual: giving structure

They give a list of 9 core characteristics that constitute the anatomy of ritual, based on Ronald. L. Grimes’ The Craft of Ritual Studies. (Grimes put Ritual Studies on the academic map). This list is the guideline that is used throughout the book.

“Ritual is one of the oldest human activities-often considered as important as eating, sex, and shelter. Why has it persisted so long? Why does every attempt to suppress it result in creating it anew? What makes ritual seems at once so foundational that even animals do it so superfluous that Protestants once imagined they could dispense it altogether?”

Ronald Grimes, Introduction to Reading in Ritual Studies

 

ritual
Art: The Biosphere by designed by Buckminster Fuller, photo by Dennis Bathory-Kisz

 

In eleven chapters there is a diligent search for the power of ritual. In every corner, every room, every symbol, every core symbol is interpreted as a part of a ritual. A ritual can be positive as well as negative. A ritual is dualistic: it has to sustain a culture and its rulers, but it must also be a vehicle for social change.
Not an easy subject.
But it is clear that a ritual gives structure, and it needs a certain place, a certain time, with people acting in certain ways, dressed in certain clothes. Even if a ritual has no effect, people usually blame this on something they themselves have done wrong.

the power of ritual: Personal stories

What sets this book apart from other books are the very personal stories the authors use to illustrate the values that are part of any ritual. The authors take the daring step to share some very personal stories to illustrate the 9 principles of ritual and in doing so they dare to break boundaries. The only thing that was unclear to me as reader, is who is telling the story.

Almost every personal story is told in the third person perspective. To me this was a little confusing at times. There are two authors: has one author told the story, and has the other written it down?
In the final chapter, Robbie Davis finally dares to write in the first person perspective, as she tells the story of the celebration of her deceased daughter.

Her daughter died in a car crash, one of the most heartbreaking experiences any human being can ever experience. And telling it from the first person perspective makes it strong. I was there too, celebrating the life of this vibrant young girl. Being a mother myself, I feel the loss, the desperation and the celebration about the short, but beautiful life she had lived.

“When I was called to attend the lightning of the candles on the birthday cake, I told the caterers to STOP and hold it for a little while, and then I took my sweet time to walk around the beautiful gardens to note how friends and relatives had clustered to eat and talk about Peyton-forever engraved in my memory are the shining candles and my equally shining family and friends. I had learned not to simply ride the ritual train, but to stop it for a little while. so I could simply bask in the moment to drink in from the ritual every single thing it could give me.”

Conclusion

What is the verdict: to buy or not to buy?
pro:

  • The book gives a very good analysis of ritual, and frequently surprises you with new data and insights. For example: have you ever conceived giving birth in a hospital as a ritual? Have you ever realized that a ritual is like an unstoppable train? Have you ever realized that there must be a combination of internal as well as external drivers to change consciousness when performing a ritual? This book gives so much information and so much examples that you will feel more knowledgeable once you have read it.
  • I really like and admire the fact that the writers share personal stories. Having the guts to step outside the scientific anthropological point of view, they practice what they preach. You can not study a phenomenon without having experienced it yourself.
  • There are many models and theories discussed in this book. Nine aspects of ritual, states of consciousness, a cognitive matrix, the cycle of meaning, four stages of cognition… A multitude of ways to analyse ritual.
  • The book is quite easy to read.
  • There is a lot of attention for mythology and dreams in this book. Charles Laughlin is an accomplished practitioner of Tibetan yoga and talks about dreams and dream incubation with ease, and he even shows the box he created to sleep in.
  • There is much attention to the birth process of human beings. Lots of Western women (like me) never get proper educated about it because our grandmothers, mothers and sisters are too traumatized to discuss the process.
    “An electronic fetal monitoring machine, which Robbie has interpreted as the primary symbol of hospital birth (Davis-Floyd 2004), also speaks with many voices, promising to provide full information on the strength of the laboring mother’s contractions and the contraction of the fetal heart rate, representing the vast corporation that created it and the technical know-how that went into making it, and giving women a sense of psychological and emotional trust in the information it provides” (page 57).But this machine also sucks up the attention: the mother is no longer the centre of attention: the machine is. Having given birth twice in the hospital (I was obliged to do that being diabetic) I know from experience that when the heart rate of my second baby dropped significantly, this became the center of my attention for several agonizing hours.

con

  • All the models and theories can become quite confusing. I had some trouble of allocating some concepts into the picture the authors are trying to describe. There are nine major characteristics of a ritual, there are four stages of cognition, there are the twin axes of instantiation, there is the cycle of meaning, there is the technocratic, humanistic and holistic paradigms of medicine there is a cognitive matrix… It can be a bit confusing to get the big picture the authors are trying to paint for you as reader.
  • Unfortunately, there is no e-book available (yet).

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James Joyce: Juicy, Jaunty and Jaded

Think you’re escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.”
― James Joyce, Ulysses

James Joyce
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James Joyce and mythology

Mythic Worlds, Modern Words, On the Art of James Joyce, edited by Edmund Epstein for the Joseph Campbell foundation tells us how we can use James Joyce as a guide for interpreting mythological material. The book discusses the interpretations given by Joseph Campbell during the course of his life. In different lectures, workshops and presentations he has told about the effect the writings of Joyce had on him since he discovered them in 1927 in Paris.

Continue reading James Joyce: Juicy, Jaunty and Jaded

Top books 2015

Top books 2015
Strahov Monastery Library Prague
Image: Bestvalueschools.com

Since February this year, Mindfunda has been talking about dreams, mythology, spirituality and dreams. Looking back at the past months, this is the list of the best books I have reviewed. The Top books 2015 about dreaming, mythology and spirituality.

Top books 2015: Lucid dreaming, plain and simple

Lucid dreaming is a technique that became popular in the seventies because of Carlos Casteneda’s books. He described a technique that was easy: you look at your hands and you wonder if you are awake or asleep. Your hands are always with you. In his younger years Robert Waggoner trained himself to become a lucid dreamer.

top books 2015
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The book is filled  with tips and techniques that are clever and easily usable. Here you can read more about Lucid dreaming plain and simple and here you can see my interview with Robert Waggoner about it.

Top books 2015: Sidewalk Oracles

Robert Moss is an expert writer, a gifted story-teller, and his connection to the Goddess has made him one of my favorite authors when it comes to the subject of dreams and spirituality.

Top books 2015
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When people ask me if I know any good books about dreams I always say: “any book that is written by Robert Moss about the subject is excellent. Mind you, Robert used to be a writer and a journalist before concentrating on the subject of dreams. Sidewalk oracles is filled with ways of bringing magic back into your life. A fun encyclopedia to have around in times when feel the need to breaking the circle to get out of a rut.

Top books 2015: Dreaming

Jennifer Windt has been the one who completed a philosophical map of the field of dreaming. I must confess this is not an easy read, but it will give you so much more insight into the field of dreaming. Its history, its philosophy, its challenges, its limits. Just the book for the cold winter days. A book that will illuminate your mind and hopefully will give you some crazy bold ideas yourself.

 

Top books 2015
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Consciousness, what is it? Were in the brain can it be found? When you have a dreamless sleep, where are you? Professor Evan Thompson, who has written the next book on the list, says: “This book sets a new standard for the science and philosophy of dreaming in the twenty-first century.”

Top books 2015: Waking, Dreaming, Being

Using the oldest known map of consciousness, Evan Thompson, uses the newest neurological insights as a form of cartography. You can see Evan Thompson talking about Waking, Dreaming, Being in my Mindfunda interview with him.

Top books 2015
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Waking, Dreaming, Being touches the fundamental questions about consciousness, combining the newest scientific knowledge of the West with the ancient Wisdom of the East.

Top books 2015: Wake Up to Your Dreams

Justina Lasley created a method called DreamSynergy. An easy to use method that enables you to comprehend the message in a dream you remember. And to take action. Justina told me in a Mindfunda interview how her dreams turned her life around. She found the love of her life, and followed a new career path.

 

top books 2015
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Wake Up to Your Dreams is an easy to use book, with lots of examples and dreams. Justina says: “Because dreams can be complicated, I wanted to create an easy method in a book filled with exercises”.

Top books 2015: Romance of the Grail

Mythology and Mindfunda. Being as interested in dreams as I am, you can not avoid mythology. I have dreamed about Odin before I knew who he was.
And when you say mythology, you say Joseph Campbell.

 

Top books 2015
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The study of the Arthurian myth was a doorway for Joseph Campbell into comparative mythology. Using the mythological tales as symbols for spiritual development in the human psyche. In this book you can find Campbell’s dissertation: “The Dolorous Stroke”.

Top books 2015: The book of SHE

In November I started my first blog series. Throughout the month I publish 4 blogs around a central theme. This month the theme is the Descent. Going into the dark to find your inner light. In November the theme was the Goddess.
The book of SHE fitted right in. We know Joseph Campbell as the man who brought us the knowledge about the hero’s journey. Soon enough there was a lady called Maureen Murduck that acknowledged that women have got another journey.

Top books 2015
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Sara Avant Stover has taken this knowledge into the twenty-first century. Things start to change if you embrace your inner Goddess. The connection that Sara feels with Mary Magdalen is a heartfelt one. The heroine’s journey is a challenge all women must face. To have a guidebook is necessary.

MERRY CHRISTMAS!
Remember: Christmas is a very special time for dreaming, so join Mindfunda for the Holy Night Dream Incubations.

Mindfunda invites you for a Christmas celebration you will remember. For just 10 dollars you get exclusive access to a restricted private area on Mindfunda during the Holy Nights. Each night between December 24 and January 6 I will share a dream incubation. We will talk about and reflect on our dreams. Ancient belief says that during these nights the veil between the worlds is thin. Register now as Mindfunda More Member, to experience the depth of your dreams.

The Journey of the Heroine: embracing the Goddess in 5 steps

Do you consider yourself a Goddess? You should. The Goddess is the earth. We are all part of the earth. But the Goddess is more. She is also that spiritual vessel that brings love in new unexpected ways. She is connected with the moon. This week’s Mindfunda is about dreaming with the goddess, incubating dreams that align with the phase of the moon. Find out how you can dream the Goddess into your live!

Mindfunda explores the Goddess in 4 blogs

You are a heroine.  Each women, Each men who embraces his feminine side.

The Goddess was hot in the seventies of last century. Marija Gimbutas put the Goddess back on the map. She inspired a lot of scientists, anthropologists and mythologists up to this day. But the attention for the Goddess seems to have faded away. Mindfunda want to invite you to reconnect with the Goddess. During the month of November Mindfunda will share 5 blogs:

The Goddess, 4 blogs to integrate the Goddess in your life.

Eve as Goddess: a Guest blog written by Susan Scott, of the Garden of Eden.

Triple Goddess dreaming: an alliance with the moon.

The Goddess and the Earth: a Guest blog written by Trista Hendren

A review of “The Book of SHE” written by Sara Avant Stover.

< Jumped in from elsewhere? Start at part 1

Sara Avant Stover, author of “The Way of the Happy Woman” has written a new book called “The Book of SHE“:

heroine
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In her book Stover sketches a process of five steps that compose the heroine’s journey. I will tell you about the five steps in a minute. First, let’s recapture what the hero’s journey is and why there is an explicit need for a heroine’s journey.

The need for the Journey of the Heroine

Joseph Campbell analyzed myths and constructed a concept known as “the hero’s journey”. There is a problem in the world, a problem that affects everyone.

 

heroine
Artwork by storyboardthat.com

 

The hero gets a call to adventure: you are the chosen one!. The hero refuses. A mentor arrives and after several failures the hero changes the bad into good and returns to the ordinary world. Campbell tells about this story in his excellent book “The Hero with a Thousand Faces”

 

heroine
The hero with a thousand faces

Maureen Murdock, a student of Campbell felt a void in this journey. It was a journey aimed at men. Aimed at their initiations and the integration of their inner female part. When she discussed this with Campbell he said:
“Women don’t need to make the journey, they are the place that everyone is trying to get to.” His response shocked me. It is true that in the mythological tradition, the feminine is the place people may be aspiring to integrate, but what I was aware of was that most of the women I knew and worked with were disconnected from our feminine nature. Our task was to reclaim the feminine for ourselves. (quoted from the site of Maureen Murdock).
The hero’s journey model did not address the deep wounding of the feminine part for both men and women.

OK, let’s roll up the sleeves. Let’s pack our suitcases. We are ready to journey. What are the steps?

heroine

Steps in the journey of the heroine

Sara Avant Stover gives five steps that comprise the journey of the heroine:

  1. Prepare for the pilgrimage.
  2. Descent into the underworld.
  3. Bonfire of our initiation.
  4. Ascent.
  5. Homecoming.

Sara, inspired by Maureen Murdock, explains the idea behind the steps: “The  more gender-specific map of the heroine’s journey better helps us to understand the unique twists and turns that our initiation into empowered womanhood entails. It ensures that we arrive at our desired destination – living in full alignment with our deepest, truest feminine nature”

Journey of the heroine: Prepare for the Pilgrimage

heroine
the 13 stages of the journey of the heroine

 

Many women are their fathers’ daughters… I know I was. I always wanted to be like him: smart, witty, a bit Einstein professor-ish. We could laugh, we could talk, we could argue (I have never met any other human being that was capable of thinking so fast as my father). And to me it was a game. Others thought we were fighting but it was more like a cub fights a big lion. I know he was preparing me for the world and that in this thought-driven world you would need to have my argumentative skills sharp like a knife.

 

heroine
My father with hair like Einstein

 

We, as women, are taught to live our life according to the patriarchal definition of success. Getting good grades, a well-paying job, a nice husband, a couple of kids. And to be successful in doing all of those tasks while being attractive, smiling and graceful. I was told to not “throw like a girl” but in the only right way: the way a man does. He meant well. He was a child of his times.

Healing the mother wound

Most of us have experienced, at one time or another, the pain of our mother abandoning us in our time of need. This does not mean it was a conscious abandonment… I know my mother was raised in a time when you were supposed to leave a child crying “otherwise you would spoil it”. My mother and my aunt both said it to me when I had children of my own: “whenever they cry, don’t fetch them. or you will spoil them”. Luckily I decided to do just the opposite and most of the time wore my kids close to my heart when they were little.

I know we all remember that guidance that our parents gave us. But there comes a point in your life when you have to decide that you are not happy living according to rules that are not yours to begin with. That intuitive feeling in your gut is the moment that you are called to leave your normal life.

When you have reconciled that inner masculine and female energy that you inherited from your parents you are balanced enough to consider entering the spiritual marriage.

Journey of the Heroine: Descent into the Underworld

“No tree, it is said,
can grow to heaven 
unless its roots reach down to hell.”

Carl Gustav Jung

Once you have left your home, you are on a path to discover your shadow. It is a step that is as essential as it is painful. But in the realization and the acceptance of your own faults, flaws and difficulties there is also the inner peace.

heroine
Black Madonna

Knowing that you do not have to be perfect. That it is alright to be angry, stubborn and perky. To embrace the power in those qualities. To admit that sometimes you cause trouble. Not others. You.

Ok that is do-able, but do I have to like it? Do I have to embrace my stubbornness?  Do I have to blurt out everything I am thinking, even though it is true? I have learned that it is a quality that can cause much harm. Sara Avant Stover suggests we do our shadow work daily, in private. She offers some powerful questions like: “What do you fear is the worst that could happen if you allow the world to see who you “really” are?

Sara shares a wonderful chapter on PMS and your hormone cycle: comparing the moon with the womb. I remember when I used to suffer through my periods and how that changed once I started eating natural food. Stover compares the seasons with female hormones. She offers encouragement to accept that you are not the same everyday and to allow yourself a period of recovery. Look at PMS as a message from your dark side. Notice signs and synchronicities. Say no. Dive into your anger: write down the reasons for your irritations, embrace the power of your aggression even have a conscious temper tantrum. Turn on music real loud and get it out!

Journey of the Heroine: the Initiation

“The feminine journey is about going down deep into soul, healing and reclaiming, while the masculine journey is up and out, to spirit.”

Maureen Murdock

Ever since I dreamed -with a couple of friends of mine- my way trough the Red Book I have been contemplating my own initiations. This culture has not got many… Going to school for me was such a pleasure, I felt real grown up and intelligent. My next initiation was getting my period for the first time. It was not celebrated. My sisters told me that I had to suffer this until I was about fifty. That did not seem like fun. Next initiation was my first kiss. I liked that a lot better than my former initiation. Looking back, I regret that our society has stopped initiating children.

Sara Stover writes about meeting the Dark Goddess, talking with her and asking permission to return to the light: “..Slowly walk toward the Dark Goddess. Ask her if she got anything she needs to tell you before you leave her domain“. This part of the book illustrates that the journey of the heroine is the opposite of the journey of the hero. The hero needs to balance his male and female sides so the journey goes down and up again. The journey of the heroine is a spiral: she goes round in circles and circles, but in each return she has changed. If you look at the story

heroine
Emma Swan and her son

 

of Emma Swan in the series “Once Upon a Time” you see a lady who has to believe in magic, learns to believe in herself, and finally descends to become the Dark One. All the time, like any modern-day Goddess, being the mother of a single son.

Journey of the Heroine: Ascent

Almost every woman I know, including myself knows that she must hide her sexuality. But sexuality is one of the core elements of the goddess. She is fertility. She is seduction. So how do we get that sparkle in our eyes back?

 

heroine

Sara gives a few tips, most of them are very obvious: sleep naked, dance, take care of your appearance. Dress like a goddess.

Journey of the heroine: homecoming

You went on a journey, visited the dark places, enlightened the flame, and now you must return. Same old place, same old rules, new you. You are no longer a girl. You are a Heroine. “We live forever together -mothers, grandmothers, sisters and daughters. We believe in you”.
I hope you have enjoyed the journey…

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Wanda Burch about her book “She who Dreams” so sign up and don’t miss it.

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Romance of the Grail: 3 discoveries

“The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe, to match your nature with Nature”.

Joseph Campbell

Grail and synchronicity

Several years ago I had a dream that ends with a voice-over telling me: “You belong to the court of Arthur“. I respond that Arthur is just a story.

I was wrong. The myth of King Arthur and the search for the grail is so much more.

Do you believe in synchronicity? When I requested a review copy of Robert Moss’s new book Sidewalk Oracles (a review is coming up, I am playing the games so I can walk the walk just as much as I talk the talk) something happened. Kim  of New World Library asked me, “Would you also like a review copy of Romance of the Grail?” I gasped for breath; synchronicity did not just knock on my door, but kicked it in.
Years ago, after having the dream I mention above, I discovered that Arthur meant bear and bear was the totem animal of Robert Moss. The Bear is the oldest worshiped deity of the world,  “So this is a bear god: the valley, and the river there , running by Lourdes, is called the River of the Bear (the Ourse). This is the God Arthur. I think I can make the point that Lake Geneva  is therefore the source of the whole idea of King Arthur’s departure on a boat after his death to the Isle of the Golden Apple, the Isle of Avalon” (Romance of the Grail).
So I invited Robert Moss to give a workshop on Active Imagination in the Netherlands. And now his book about synchronicity guided me back to Arthur and the Grail

Romance of the Grail

Joseph Campbell coined the term monomyth. To quote Wikipedia: “..Monomyth refers to the theory that sees all mythic narratives as variations of a single great story. The theory is based on the observation that a common pattern exists beneath the narrative elements of most great myths, regardless of their origin or time of creation”.
That is an attractive idea isn’t it? The idea that we, members of the human race, are so very much alike in our needs, in our challenges and in our solutions, that the basic problems myths guide you through boil down to a couple of themes.
I want you to know that I find this a very work-able assumption even though it is criticized now. I also agree with the critics. Ellwood stated in 1999: “A tendency to think in generic terms of people, races … is undoubtedly the profoundest flaw in mythological thinking.” But putting that aside, I think the contribution Joseph Campbell made to mythology is phenomenal. He brought mythology to you and me, into our simple lives and made us feel the energy of the Gods and Goddesses.

The book is composed by Evans Lansing Smith who spent many hours reading and listening to lectures of Campbell and who attended a lot of his travels and workshops. By reading the notes of Campbell Lansing Smith was able to present the wealth of knowledge that Joseph Campbell left behind. The work of a man who used to read 4 hours every day for nine years with the sole purpose of educating himself. Reading this book will let you reap the fruits of his work on what is called “The most important mythology for the Western World”.

Romance of the Grail discovery #1

Editor Evans Lansing Smith, chair of the mythological studies at the Pacifica Graduate Institute, has composed a book that will elicit several aha’s.
He starts out with painting the background of Europe through the centuries. His main point is that there simply was no European culture. Europe was invaded by Indo-European tribes since the Neolithic times, 10,200–8,800 BC. and Roman Emperor Theodosius I, Roman Emperor from AD 379 to AD 395, issued decrees that made Christianity the official religion of his Empire. Europe became subjected to a religion that had its origin in Jerusalem. The old pagan traditions were destroyed. The European (Western) emphasis on the individual shifted towards the Eastern sense of community spirit.
So this totally alien point of view was imposed on Europe. Europe had perfectly good religions and mythologies and this other thing was brought on top of it.”

The Christian church believes that we are born in sin. Jesus Christ can save us but the only way to come close to Christ is to get the sacraments from a priest. And a priest was able to behave in a rather un-Christian manner, without being disciplined by the church.  Of course not all of them, but many did. The Arthurian Romance is a way of dealing with this controversy.

Joseph Campbell’s never before published master’s thesis “The Dolorous Stroke” in the Appendix of this book provides clear insight into the genius of Campbell’s mind. His analysis of the similarities and differences in Grail stories with great detail. The Fisher King, based on Jesus his statement:  “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men” is wounded by a lance at the time of a feast. So the King is wounded. Worse than that: he is made sterile. He can not reproduce anymore. And he is closely related to his land: his land also becomes infertile. This fertility God is wounded. The church is too much about following rules and ignores the spiritual side of the sun. The connection of people with their own sense of spirituality was cut off. The King was wounded.

The solution was to be found in love. Joseph Campbell’s Romance of the Grail distinguishes between erotic passion and agape: spiritual love. The romance that the Grail perspective prescribes is a combination of love that is born in the eyes as well as in the heart. Parzival as described in Wolfram van Eschenbach (German knight and poet who inspired Wagner’s Parsifal and who uses the name Parzifal spelled with a z), is a happily married man who enters the Castle, meets the Fisher King but does not ask the question: Who serves the Grail?

grail
Parsifal in the tarot

 

Wait.
I just told you that love was the answer.
No here is a happily married man, married out of love which was quite uncommon in these days. He is in the castle, with the wounded King. So all the variables are present but no catharsis. No solution. He fails to ask the question that could heal the King. Why?

Blame it on the mother? He was told not to ask too many questions. He did not want to come across as impolite. So he dismissed the question in his heart. Growing up you need to decide if you are going to head your parental advice or if you are going your own way. And make some mistakes along the path. Because the mother of Parsifal wanted him to be polite.

Again here is a mythical notion to let rules be rules. To follow the heart. Campbell said “Follow your Bliss” for a reason. Don’t we all know that moment when we follow conventions while our heart screams out something different?

Romance of the Grail discovery #2

An important theme in the Grail stories is the theme of enchantment versus disenchantment. Sometimes in dreams you are the only one who sees flowers. Sometimes in waking live you are the only one who sees the beauty of a person, of an event or of a tragedy.
Everything needed is already there only it is not being seen. And what the hero is to do is to clarify the situation

grail
picture: Plantscapers.com

 

I remember a few months before my mothers’ death I had a dream of her sitting with a sister of mine at the couch in the palace of the Bishop. I saw flowers everywhere. All the guests where talking, laughing and eating and I seemed to be the only one aware of those flowers. I followed the trail outside. In the hallway there was an undertaker. I felt so much grief in my heart when I handed over the flowers to him (a lot of the flowers lay on the floor at his feet). I asked him to take good care of my mother. Waking up I realized that I could only survive the loss of my last parent by seeing and honoring the flowers embedded in the situation.

There is enchantment in the descent to the underworld to meet the dark aspects of your soul. To become aware that deep in the darkness is the soil that nourishes the flowers. And to realize that not everybody will appreciate them. That there are people who do not even see them. What was the last time when you saw flowers where no one else noticed them?

Romance of the Grail discovery #3

Almost all  of us know the Grail as the story of the love between Guinevere and Lancelot. In our time this theme is relevant and the most handsome actors and actresses depict the honorable fight between lust, love and honor. In 1995, the film  First night depicted Richard Gere as the attractive Lancelot who tried to walk away from temptation. Romance of the Grail explains how a story about the ancient Celtic fertility gods was reshaped in a story about adultery.

 

Grail
Arthur, Guinevere and Lancelot
First Knight

“After Renaissance, a god wounded by a lance, whose injury entails the blight of his land and the misery of his people, revived by a magic question or salve of blood was incredible. Therefore it was not surprising that Tennyson should have substituted a sin of adultery: the sin of Guinevere and Lancelot”.
In the middle ages in the story Lancelot, le Chevalier de la Charrette written by Chrétien de Troyes this love mentioned for the first time.

Guinevere was abducted by a Lord that belongs to the underworld. In ancient times ladies were in the habit of being abducted, waiting for a knight to come and rescue them. While Arthur stays at Camelot, Lancelot climbs on his horse and goes out for his love. He drives so hard that two horses die. He hesitates for three steps if he would take a cart driven by a churl. He would be faster in the tower were Guinevere is kept prison but a card is used for people who ride in the cart are being taken to be hanged or punished in some way. He hesitates for three steps but takes the cart.

Next trial is what we know as the Perilous bed.
“This is the masculine experience of the feminine temperament: that it doesn’t quite make sense, but there it is. That’s the way it’s shifting this time, that’s the way it’s going that time. The trial is to hold on, be patient and don’t try to solve it. Just endure it, and then all the boons of beautiful womanhood will be yours.” [Transformations of Myth Through Time]. Once a hero has integrated the anima or the feminine side of his character there is another challenge. The bridge of Swords.

The bridge of swords is the Razor’s edge as Somerset Maugham described it in his novel.

Grail
The Razor’s edge

If you follow your own path you can be swept away by your own passion. As Jeffrey Leach puts it on Amazon in a review: “The Razor’s Edge” really has a simple message. It asks us to reflect on how we lead our lives. Do we follow the masses or seek inner fulfillment? Is it right or wrong to drop out of society and follow our inner selves? Maugham makes us ponder these questions as he introduces us to his characters.

Finally our hero frees Guinevere out of the tower but she is as cold as ice. Why? Because he has hesitated for three steps. His ego for that moment was a few seconds stronger as the passion in his heart. No mercy for the brain. Ask yourself: when was the last time I acted out of love, without thinking? At this moment whose path do you follow? Your own? And if so: that is still no guarantee for fulfillment: you have to walk on a sharp edge to avoid getting cut. It is almost impossible, but it is worth it.

Romance of the Grail conclusion

I started this blog by telling you that being offered Romance of the Grail for a review was a moment of synchronicity. So while reading it and making notes I tried to look at why Arthur, the Bear, came knocking again. In four years I have made certain steps to follow my passion about mythology, spirituality and dreaming. And what everybody told me: that it does not pay the bills, unfortunately is true. Still I feel rewarded in so many other aspect: the people I meet, the books I read, controlling my own time.

I like the way the Romance of the Grail is crafted. I like the fact that The Dolorous Stroke is an appendix of this book. I feel so much more informed about the symbols and the themes that prevail in the Arthur myth that I can only advice you to read the book and let the magic work for you. As Joseph Campbell explains:
“We have recognized at the heart of the Celtic mythology, a belief in the might of magic”. I think we should all shelter and nurture this believe.

Can the Grail be here? You range through the house
seeking, only to return to the great sky-lit space.
She says, “Be still, and open. Stand like a tree,
open like a flower, like a chalice, at your crown.”
You remember the crown you once wore
and you let that go, and open. “Drink the light.”
You drink deep, and something opens deeper in you
in the cavity of the heart, a cup is filing with light.
Light streams from the heart, pure waterfall, and you know
you have found the Grail, in the one place it can be found.

Robert Moss

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Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being.
I will interview Wanda Burch about her book She who dreams in November so sign up and don’t miss it.

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Mythological Musings: 2 Mindfunda’s to discover mythology in your own life

Remember when you were young? How your history teacher would tell you with radiant eyes- about the Greek mythology? Mythology seems far away. How are mythological stories relevant in your life today? Mindfunda explores mythological themes in 2 blogs :

Your mythic life
Myth Stories

Mythological themes in your mythic life

Personal myths structure our awareness and point us in the direction that becomes our path” as June Singer describes it in the foreword of the book Personal Mythology.

mythological
Personal Mythology

This book written by David Seinfeld and Stanley Krippner, might change the vision you have of your life and your role in it.
The writers invite you to look at your life as a fairy tale and to describe your role according to the hero’s journey. This blog will identify the steps you can take to start writing and re-writing your own story.

Mythological themes in stories

Films and television series: the hero’s journey has become a concept for any scriptwriter. Almost all of us know how the hero’s journey has guided George Lucas in creating Star Wars.

mythological
The Hero’s journey

If there is a film or a television series that resonates with you, there is bound to be a mythological theme hidden that will guide you on your path. If you look at the success of films like the Matrix or Sense8 you will know how alive mythological themes still are. We will also talk about some old gems and their mythological perspective like my fair lady and apocalypse now.

Gaming also uses mythological themes. In gaming you use an avatar while being present: a dream like state of awareness. In that way, gaming represents a form of awareness you also experience during dreaming: a third person’s perspective. You identify with the avatar/dream image, but you are aware that you are not your avatar. Stepping from this third person perspective of awareness into a first person’s perspective will broaden your horizon.

Mythological themes in culture

The culture you grew up in. every culture has its own sense of mythology. Most of us are familiar with the Greek and Roman mythology. we know the Greek and Roman names for several gods: Zeus for Jupiter and Hades for Pluto.
Ralph Metzner has told us how most Europeans and Americans are descendents from the warrior tribes that invaded Europe.

mythological
the well of remembrance


Having a horse and carriage gave them the chance to defeat the original tribes. The third Mindfunda blog will explore the different cultural mythologies.

Mythological themes to resolve crises

Crises: that is when you need the lessons of mythological stories the most. When you fall in love, leave your parents, lose a job, when you feel that the whole world is against you. We have all been there. Mythological stories tell about how sometimes you need some help from a magical creature. They tell you to look for the strength within. This blog will look at leaving home and becoming a (wo)man, about finding true love and about loosing your loved one.

Read on in Part 2

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Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being.

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THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independant site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Mythofunda:
“Myths are public dreams, dreams are private myths” Joseph Campbell used to say. This part of Mindfunda shows you how your personal mythology can create peace in your life.

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


(Ready for more free Mindfunda content on ‘#MYTHOLOGY‘?

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Reading the Red Book, part 2 : Psychic Powers and dreams

Every body knows the vision Jung had about Europe covered in blood right before World War One started. Dreams seem to be connected with psychic powers.

This is Mindfunda's presentation for the Dream Weekend organized by the Dutch society for dreamers: Vereninging voor de Studie van Dromen (VSD) . Unfortunately influenza payed me an uninvited visit. I was not able to attend the weekend. Aad van Ouwerkerk, author and dream worker read my presentation to the visitors. I thank him for doing that.

This is a series of blogs about my proces of dreaming my way through the Red Book. I have divided it into five steps:
Carl Jung
Psychic Power and dreams
Animus/anima dreams
God
the Self.
Psychic Powers and total darkness

We all have been there: in total darkness. Lost and alone, looking for a new way of life. A new way of being. In those moments of darkness it seems like our psychic powers lighten up out path.

Carl Jung began writing the Red Book on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Mindfunda looks at his search for the supreme meaning in five (easy) steps. Because this will be a long post I have divided it into five parts. By clicking on each part it will guide you to the step I am talking about.

 

psychic powers
Red Book – Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)

This blog will talk about the second step of my proces of reading the Red Book: psychic powers and dreams.

Psychic Powers and Receiving THE Red book

In Jung’s eyes it was a relieve when world war one broke out. A confirmation that he was not schizophrenic, like he feared when the visions kept enduring.
Almost all of us have experienced dreams and visions where we knew about something that was going to happen. The National Dream Centre did research in 2014 called Project August. A random group of people were incubating dreams about big headlines for the month of August. The results (see link) were amazing. Out of the 119 headlines dreamed up by the group 100 actually got published…

When I ordered the Red Book, it had to be mailed to me from America. Usually they put it on the slow boat to China. there was no way of telling when I was going to receive it. But the night before I received the Red book I had the following dream:

I am in a department store. A voice over says: “It is now closing time would you all please leave?”. I see the elevator at the end of the hallway and I start running. I manage to jump into the elevator. In it is a man with glasses on:

psychic powers

He reached across me and pushed the button to get the elevator down.
It was time for me to reach down to my soul…

Psychic Powers and Our Dream Group

The Red that Jung saw in his vision came back in our dream group. Maria Cernuto shared this dream:

A man died. His blood is being used to paint. There was something significant about his blood – like whomever he was in life was important. The idea is that the blood is his life force, and from his death, the act of painting is creating new life. I think I am the one painting / creating. I am standing before, and looking at, a large blank canvas.

The red in this dream has a magical quality, filled with psychic powers. One of the core concepts explored in the Red Book is the uniting of opposites. In this dream a picture is painted on white canvas. The Red blood, the life power is the material to perform the art of living. You can use this life force to create any kind of imagery you want. Just put your heart and soul in it…

Christian Gerike alerted our group that many people had shared red in their dreams. He shares one of his own:

I am with some people, there is a “cubby-hole” in the wall, and past some kind of blankets covering it, I can see a person sitting in it, head to my right, body is partially scrunched up, perhaps propped up, and the person is reading  . . . the person looks toward us and he has very long bright reddish hair, he shakes his head and the hair falls out of the cubbyhole . . ”

Just crawl through that little cubbyhole of your personal defending wall. We all have built one because live can be cruel. The hair, as a symbol of force (remember the tale of Samson?) sticks through it…

Christian was also struck by the Red Book and Jung’s dreams/visions with blood in them. Not only his precognitive dream of Europe covered in blood. But also such entries in the Red Book as the bloody head of a man (p. 147, reader’s edition); and a red stream of blood, thick red blood springs up (p. 148, reader’s edition). Also, In the deepest of the stream shines a red sun(p. 148, reader’s edition).  Red people, Red Book, blood, red sun. It reminded Christian and the rest of the group about rubedo in alchemy.

Psychic Powers and The Mirror of Truth

The Red of the Red Book is also mentioned in a book called Speculum Veritatis, attributed to Eugenius Philalethes, representing The Perfect Red King. The mirror of truth and the Red King both appeared in dreams of our group. Maria shared this dream:
“There is a mirror you put on the wall. When you look into the mirror it brought you into a higher consciousness or greater reality… brought you to a higher level.  Recall gazing into the mirror, my reflection receding into darkness, and then feeling like I was transported into another dimension.”

Again in this dream there is a need to be aware of the darkness before you can be transported to another dimension. The shadow that played a big part in Jung his theory is a reality in our dreams.

Jenna shared her dream “Loyalty to the King”:

 “I am in a coach pulled by a horse galloping fast down a dark road. I have an old wound beneath my heart on my left side. I feel the pain of it, but it is almost healed. In the dream I hear the words that it was a “conspirator’s blow” given me by an enemy of the King. I am fiercely loyal to the King and would never betray him (I feel this intensely in the dream), so I am traveling fast, lest the conspirator catch me again. I must get to the King quickly and warn him of this old enemy. I am feeling much love for the King as I go to meet him.”

Here again, the dream makes us aware that taking the “dark road” is essential for saving the King. There is also a reference to the story of Parzival and King Arthur.

Jung’s felt that the Arthur story was THE myth of the Western World. An old wound by the heart on the left side can only be caused by love. And only be healed by the person caused the wound. Like the oracle told to Telephus wounded by Achilles. It is all about love. The wound by the heart on the left side, the feminine side of feeling, mothering, seduction, enchantment. But also the side of wrath and revenge, sorcery and delusion as Joseph Campbell explains in his “The masks of God”.

psychic powers
Red King

“This simple symbol of a fire triangle with three radiating arrows below represents the “Perfect Red King,” the Sulfur of the Philosophers. In alchemy, sulphur represents Sol, the fiery male element (the counterpart of Luna, mercury, the female element) of the Celestial marriage (conjunctio). Chemically, the red sulfur was a mixture of mercury (spirit) and sulfur (soul), the marriage of which also represented the spiritual goal of alchemical work. This emblem appears in the Constantine, the movie adaptation of the Hellblazer Comic Book series, as a tattoo worn as a protective device by the title character, used to summon the angel Gabriel”. (Quote from symbol dictionary.net). Linda Mastrangelo shared her dream about a marriage between spirit and soul:

I am in this otherworldly community- of very sweet loving and compassionate people. I have fallen in love with a young man and the unfolding of this love is witnessed by the community in the dream. At first there is shyness and vulnerability. A hesitancy-is this Love true? I can feel this fear coming from him and I’m also paying attention to my own feelings. There is a dizzying attraction here that only comes with new love-we are hugging and kissing -the energy is transferred to both if us and our community. There is a tender moment where I am truly clear about my feelings as we hold each other under the stars.

I whisper to him “I love you” and tell him I want yo be with him and live here in the community. I mean it. And there is a moment of relief from him — a big smile and hug. It is true. Our love is real. This love is important and tied to the community. The Union will benefit the community and the community will benefit the Union.

It is a sacred marriage.

It was a Big Dream with the feelings still resonating hours after waking.I can’t help but feel connections to Anima/Animus and to Soul. Also the importance of clarity, Truth of feeling and intention.

> Read on in part 3, about: Animus/anima dreams

 

< Jumped in from elsewhere? Start at part 1 

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