Best Books on Dreams 2017

What are the best books on dreams in 2017? And my question to you: what are the most inspiring books about dreams you have never read? Let me know in the comments because I love to get inspired by new books.

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You know I read a lot (I actually mean a LOT). I consider it to be a part of my self-development. I set aside at least one hour each day to immerse myself in the think-pattern of another human being. I taste it, feel it, play with it, sometimes get annoyed about it, sometimes it leaves me hungry for more…

Recently I sent out a mail to several people who I consider to be thought-leaders in their area of expertise, asking them to name me books that had inspired them.

“Let me think about that”, was the response I got from most of them. And a few actually mailed back some good books. And I will share them with you today.

Best books on dreams 2017

Robert Waggoner,  Past president of Th International Association for the study of Dreams, co-editor of the online magazine The Lucid Dreaming Experience

best books on dreams
Robert Waggoner

 

 

 

 

 

Robert says:  “When a distinguished researcher and Professor emeritus of psychology writes a book on dreams that seem clairvoyant, telepathic or precognitive, and research studies that support this, I pay attention.  This is a fascinating, thoughtful and well-written look at what science often refuses to look at, the paranormal dream”.

Robert is talking about the writer Carlyle T Smith. He is Professor Emiritus at Trent University Peterborough, Ontario, Canada and Director of Trent University Sleep Research Laboratories.

“Have you ever had a dream about someone you have not seen or heard from in months or years – and then later the same day you actually run into this person, or they telephone or write? You have had a Heads-Up dream” (from the website Heads Up Dreaming).

 

 

Deirdre Barrett , Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard, past president of the International Association for the Study of Dreams mentions an article instead of best books on dreams.

Deirdre Barrett

 

 

 

 

 

 

This article describes the discovery of the “dream spot“.

In a research of 46 persons the difference in brain activity was measured while dreamers were experiencing dreams in Rem and Non Rem sleep. The article, published in Nature Neuroscience, shows that there is a change in activity in a certain part of the brain called ‘posterior cortical hot zone’.

 

best books on dreams 2017

When waking people up while they had activity in that specific hot zone, no matter if the were in REM or in Non Rem sleep, they were experiencing dreams!

And what could even be more exciting: during wakefulness you also have similar activity in this dream spot. There is thin line between a blurry kind of wakefulness and dreams.

Now there is even more chance for scientists to resolve issues with insomnia or PTSD.

Stanley Krippner, Professor of Psychology on Saybrook University, known for his extensive knowledge of shamanism and mythology

best books on dreams 2017
Stanley Krippner

 

 

 

 

 

told me that he is impressed and inspired by Kelly Bulkely’s book Big Dreams. In his eyes it is one of the best books on dreams.

best books on dreams 2017
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Kelly Bulkeley pleads in this book to search for the so called Big Dreams. Those dreams that make a lasting impression and that chance your life.

Dream databases are filled with what I call “HTK’s”: House, Town and Kitchen Dreams. Ordinary dreams. And he wants us, but most of all other researchers to collect and research those big, life changing dreams and analyse them so we can draw conclusions about us, human beings a dreaming species.

Elaine Mansfield, Jungian author and inspirational blogger, who often gets inspired by dreams mentions a dream classic we all know as being the best book on dreams. This book has been on my bedside table for quite a while.

best books on dreams 2017
Elaine Mansfield

 

 

 

 

 

“I’ve done lots of dreamwork with Jungian analyst Robert Bosnak. I’ve also done trauma and healing work with him. His technique of connecting the dreamer deeply with the sensory dream images and embodying the images (rather than interpreting) transforms me every time.

best books on dreams 2017
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My favorite book of his is not new, but I listed it below. I love his technique of Embodied Imagination because you don’t have to be an expert to help a friend or partner with a dream—although it helps to be skilled. It’s about asking questions, slowing down the waking mind, and illuminating the images. Being with the dream. Bosnak’s technique was important in my marriage because it allowed us to do deep work together without stepping on each other’s dream toes”.

Bosnak has been an inspiration for me as well. If I had not been married, I would have sold all my stuff, and gone to America, to start working in his Santa Barbara Healing centre.  Even if he had not paid me (don’t tell him about this, because I like earning enough money to pay my bills), I would have helped and stayed around just as long for him to say: “Hey, that girl needs a job her, let’s sign her up, she’s doing good stuff”.

Another one of his books, the one that changed my way of working with dreams is Tracks in the Wilderness of Dreaming. What this book did for me was to make me aware that there are themes in dreams. Themes that evolve. And that you can  use dreams to carefully monitor how, and if you are changing. Now I have been never cutting up my dreams in words like he suggests but I always like creative suggestions. If you like dreams you’re going to love Tracks in the Wilderness and all the new ideas it has to offer (yes I know the book isn’t exactly new, but the creative ideas within it are timeless).

The Dutch Dreaming Society VSD has a president called John van Rouwendaal. (Did you know we might get another dream conference in the Netherlands in 2019? As we speak (or read) John is making calls, sending emails and coming up with new and creative ideas to make this one of the best conferences ever).

best books on dreams 2017
John van Rouwendaal

 

 

 

 

 

John mentions this as being one of his best books on dreams: Avision the Way of the Dream. “This book was suggested to me on the last Dutch Dream Conference in Rolduc. I have read it and it was very inspiring” he tells me in his mail.

 

best books on dreams 2017
Buy the Book using this link and Support the good work of Mindfunda

 

The author, Anthony Lunt was an advanced student of the psychiatrist R.D.Laing. Laing viewed mental illness as a shamanic process. Quoted from Wikipedia: “For Laing, mental illness could be a transformative episode whereby the process of undergoing mental distress was compared to a shamanic journey”. Anthony’s wife Anna received dreams that she interpreted as an ongoing educational process.

Another inspiring book that John mentions is Dreamtime, an aboriginal Odyssey by Nigel Clayton.

best books on dreams 2017
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It’s a story about myths and legends  about Aboriginal society. It’s only 61 pages and it sounds really like something I would enjoy very much. I might be tempted to buy it and write something about it for Mindfunda.

Susanne van Doorn, Dutch psychologist, blogger & author

best books on dreams
Susanne van Doorn, MSc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I doubted a long time if I would put myself on this list. I know I read a lot, but I am not famous. I do have you, my dear reader who follows me on my path to wisdom and self discovery. So I decided to add myself to the list, in the humble position of being the last one.

One of my definitions of an inspiring book is that you pick it up to read (parts of) it again.  For Mindfunda, I usually review semi-scientific dream books. One of my new favourite best books on dreams is Joseph Campbell’s The Mythic Dimension

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On page 207 (but the rest of the book is also fascinating) Campbell describes the process of kundalini in its ascending phases. I shave read Campbell’s analysis of the energy between Freud and Jung with the enthusiasm of a trembling virgin…

I had always heard that Campbell and Jung did not really get along, but this book sketches another vision.

Besides Jung and Freud, (there are Dream enthusiasts who get real tired about the Freud-Jung thing, even though in my eyes the Jung Freud paradigm represents the science – mythology paradox par excellence. Freud being the “scientific” one who was always out for reason. Jung, the spiritual one, who battled against the role of scientist), this book is filled with stories and mythologies that will make your hungry heart sing.

Mythology, the Goddess, symbolism, mythological themes in art and as a cherry on the pie a whole chapter on erotic irony and mythic forms in the art of Thomas Man. It’s not everyone’s cup of tea, but I love it.

I am currently reading Mutants & Mystics, Science Fiction, Superhero Comics and the Paranormal written by Jeffrey J. Kripal.

I have been reading it, bit by bit, for quite some time now.  It’s pleasant and remarkable. Let me give a quote, about Palmer, an artist/publicist of strip science fiction books:

“Palmer’s first published story, “The Time Ray of Sandra’ in Science Wonder Stories was a classic example of the mytheme of Orientation, that is, it was a time travel story that involved a lost civilisation. He based the details of the landscape he wrote about on one of his many dreams (he claimed he dreamed every night and could remember his dreams in great detail), only to get a letter from a field guide in Africa who had just published a story and was certain the writer was one of the few people whom he had personally guided up the mouth of a river on the Atlantic coast of southwest Africa: the details were all precise. The guide simply did not believe Palmer when the teenager wrote back and confessed he had never been to Africa… If I the dreaming was true, why not the imaging? (page 97)

I promise that I will write a Mindfunda blog about it. I hope you enjoyed my blog, feel free to share and comment: tell me about your favorite books.

The Self and Dreams: Case study

This is Mindfunda's presentation for the Dream Weekend organized by the Dutch society for dreamers: Vereninging voor de Studie van Dromen (VSD) . Unfortunately influenza payed me an uninvited visit. I was not able to attend the weekend. Aad van Ouwerkerk, author and dream worker read my presentation to the visitors. I thank him for doing that.

This is a series of blogs about my proces of dreaming my way through the Red Book. I have divided it into five steps:
Carl Jung
Psychic Power and dreams
Animus/anima dreams
God
the Self.

 

The Self in dreams, that is the subject of this blog. In Jungian Psychology Defining “The Self” is the Grail, the ultimate goal of the journey of life…

Red Book - Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)
Red Book – Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)

 

 

The Self in Dreams: an example

You kind of know who you are by now. But in ancient times Know Thyself  was an ultimate wisdom. How can you use dreams to get to know yourself better?

As a Jungian you have to be aware that you are creating and co creating your Self. Your persona, your shadow it is all part of your authentic self. Everything I talked about in the other four steps leads to the acknowledgment of the Self. So I am going to end this blog by sharing a wonderful dream of Jodine. In my eyes it represents the Self. The dream theater of the soul, the loss of the familiar family and the acceptance of the relative unknown as aid to find your way back home. To her surprise she finds a baby in a red cradle. A child of joy The red book is like the passionate eros, baby and grown man. I hope you have fun reading it!

 

self
picture: innovationinpractice.com

 

Dream location is a small theater space. There is a director working with actors who are practicing and producing a play. He is an older man and seems familiar to me, reminds me of ? Can’t quite place him though I see him with grayish short curly hair, intelligent, very perceptive and also aware of me as well as the actors and everything going on. The creative authority.

The scene develops into a very grand theater, like one in London where there are massive balconies all around as well as the main floor stage and seating. The play is now proceeding in full costume and action and the cast is enlarged.

I am with others, a group of us, on an upper level watching the performance. Our group is maybe a dozen people and Terry and David (my son) and other familiar people are with me. We are very excited that the “house” is full, every seat taken. A big success.

Before this scene or perhaps after, the time is Dream time, not chrono time, and so proceeds in a circular or all at once kind of time: there is this action-

I am with my gang though a smaller number than in the theater. We are in a large bookstore which is also a meeting place, like Shakespeare & Company( the real store in London & also the original one in Paris which appeared in the book I was just reading in waking reality).

I receive a message, a physical slip similar to a telegram on blue or purplish paper. It indicates the name of the theater director/playwright who I am to look up & make a connection with. The note was sent from Joy Fatooh. Even as I receive it I discover to my surprise and pleasure that Joy is right there in the store! We are thrilled to see each other. Her son is with her and he is a small boy or infant who has been placed in a red cradle, a very quaint old-fashioned one, by the cash register. There are many layers of cool little shirts for him in the cradle. Seems he or Joy can choose which ones to take and wear. Her son is both a baby and also grown- there is a timelessness about him. I am very happy to see Joy and also Joy’s son.

Final scene of dream which seems to come after the theater performance:

As the play ends and amid great celebration of the success & huge turnout for it, we rise and start to leave our seats. I want to talk to the director and commend him so I’m a little behind the others who are leaving.

My group is moving fast exiting the theater & I hurry to keep up but lose sight of them outside the hall. We are in a university like area, perhaps Cal Berkeley. I try to follow where I think they’ve gone but lose track of them. I see a formal sculptural medallion or shield made of porcelain which appears to be the insignia of the university or institution &’I see it as a potential landmark to find my way. I had noted a similar one inside the building as well as now seeing it on the outside.

There is a long ramped walkway and as I proceed on it remembering we’ve come this way I realize it has changed or isn’t the same ramp- walkway & so won’t help me get to where I need to go to reunite with my group.

I then decide I need to call someone to locate them. I call Dave Emerson who was with my friends/ family! (This is a surprise, it would have been more expected for me to call Terry or David.)

So I hope to have helped you soul searching. I certainly enjoyed dreaming my way through the Red Book. if you have any questions, be sure to post them. Just remember: It is all about love. Like  “We fall in love not just with a person wholly external to us but with a fantasy of how that person can fill what is missing from our interior lives”.


< Jumped in from elsewhere? Start at part 1 

Do you like this post? Feel free to share!

Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being.

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God in dreams: 4 steps to defining your god image trough dreams

God used to speak to people in dreams. Being the son of a preacher, Jung had to search for his own religion. The Red Book is a journal of this experience.

This is Mindfunda's presentation for the Dream Weekend organized by the Dutch society for dreamers: Vereninging voor de Studie van Dromen (VSD) . Unfortunately influenza payed me an uninvited visit. I was not able to attend the weekend. Aad van Ouwerkerk, author and dream worker read my presentation to the visitors. I thank him for doing that.

This is a series of blogs about my proces of dreaming my way through the Red Book. I have divided it into five steps:
Carl Jung
Psychic Power and dreams
Animus/anima dreams
God
the Self.

 

 

Red Book - Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)
Red Book – Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)

 

God in dreams tip #1: search for the feeling

God is often referred to as “the Father.” If you ever dream of your father, be sure to explore if he is not a symbol of your inner religion.

One of the things Jung aimed at when he started to explore his visions and dreams in detail was to re-define religion.

He was disappointed in his father Paul, a preacher who seemed only interested in religion as a sum of rules.

He was disappointed in his second father Freud, for dismissing the spiritual side of psychiatry. Only in his dreams after his father died did Jung get the spiritual guidence he needed from his father. In the Red book he says:

If you do not know what divine madness is, suspend judgment and wait for the fruits. But know that there is a divine madness, which is nothing other than the overpowering of the spirit of this time through the spirit of the depths. Speak then of sick delusion when the spirit of the depths can no longer stay down and forces a man to speak in tongues instead of in human speech, and makes him believe that he himself is the spirit of the depths. But also speak of sick delusion when the spirit of this time does not leave a man and forces him to see only the surface, to deny the spirit of the depths and to take himself for the spirit of the times.” (“Decent Into Hell in the Future,” Cap. V).

god

 

On the site of Susan Olsen I found those two dreams Jung had about his father after his father died:

In the first dream, Jung is exploring a large wing of his house that he has never seen before. He finds a laboratory with shelves full of bottles containing “every imaginable sort of fish” and realizes that it is his father’s workroom. (MDR, p. 240f.) Next door is his mother’s room, in which she has set up beds for “ghostly married couples” to sleep. In his comments on the dream, Jung interpreted the fish as a Christ symbol and the beds as a “somewhat farcical” symbol of the coniunctio, the sacred marriage of the masculine and feminine principles. Although his parents were not seen in the dream, he felt their presence strongly and understood the dream to mean that “something had remained unfinished and was still with my parents; that is to say, it was still latent in the unconscious and hence reserved for the future.” Again Jung’s father (and in this case his mother) appeared “from within” as guiding figures who led him to his work on Christian symbolism in Aion (1951) and his study of alchemy and the sacred marriage in Mysterium Conjunction

In the next dream, Jung’s father is living in a large house in the country and working as the custodian of the tombs of several famous people. To his son’s great surprise, he is now a distinguished Biblical scholar. In his study he opens a large Bible bound in shiny fishskin and begins a learned exege- sis of an Old Testament passage. Then he leads Jung up a narrow staircase to a mandala-shaped room and points to an- other flight of stairs and a small door leading to the chamber of “the highest presence.” (MDR, p. 245f.) As his father kneels and touches his forehead to the ground in a gesture of rever- ence, Jung imitates him but confesses that he “could not bring my forehead quite down to the floor—there was perhaps a millimeter to spare.”

I had a fish dream concerning religion when I started my training at the Jungian institute. This dream was the first of many that would re-shape my idea of God.

I am at a party and I walk outside. There is a little lake in the garden. I walk towards it. Near the lake sits my grandmother Sophie, whom I never knew. She snatches a fish out of the water and smashes his head hard onto the ground. The eye of the fish flies up in the air. I am very mad at her for doing that. I try to revive the fish by putting it back in the water. But it is death and gone.

Sophie is the ancient mother Goddess that was kept away from the bible. The goddess of wisdom. She decided that it was time for me to break away from those catholic ideas about a male god with a beard.

Maria shared this dream:

No More Death God Names

god

I have a boy Beagle puppy. I am training him. I love him so much; he brings me so much joy. I am trying to come up with a fitting name and think “Pluto” like the God/planet and the Disney dog; but then I think how I named my Rottweiler puppy “Anubis” who was also a God connected to Death, and he died young (about 4 or 5 years old in WPR) of bone cancer and decide to stay away from Death God names. I eventually name him, but couldn’t recall on waking.

I bring him everywhere I go; everyone thinks he is adorable. Mom says, “You’re never going to be able to leave him alone if you keep bringing him with you everywhere you go.” I think to myself, “Then I won’t leave him alone.” I am petting his belly – all white fur on his underside. I hold him in my arms while he sleeps soundly. I bring him to work with me – filming on location somewhere outdoors – I have a makeup artistry gig. People watch him for me while I apply makeup / work

Christian pointed out that there could be a word pun involved here: Dog and God are the same written backwards. If you look at the dream of Maria her god image is something adorable, vulnarble that never leaves her side.

Dreams were the bridge between god and people for a long time. is this still true in your life? has your concept of god changed because of your dreams?

> Read on in the last part, about: The Self.

< Jumped in from elsewhere? Start at part 1 

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Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being.

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THIS CONTENT IS CREATED BY SUSANNE VAN DOORN, AUTHOR AND OWNER OF MINDFUNDA; MAKING THE FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY, MYTHOLOGY AND SPIRITUALITY EASY TO USE IN YOUR PERSONAL LIFE!

What is Mindfunda about?

My name is Susanne van Doorn, I am a Dutch psychologist, blogger and author. I have been working with psychology, dreams and mythology ever since I finished my study in psychology at Tilburg University. I made this independant site to share insights, and recent scientific articles about the brain, dreams, and mythology for use in your personal life.

This posting is categorised as Spirifunda:
psychology for everyday with a spiritual layer of meaning, searching for the soul. Our brains are wired for believe in magic. In a world filled with rationality, you sometimes need a little magic, a little “I wonder why”. Synchronicity, the insights of Carl Jung, the mythology used by Freud, the archetypical layers in the Tarot, the wisdom of the I Tjing, Shamanism, the oldest religion of humanity, all that information gets published in the Spirifunda section of Mindfunda.

Read more about Mindfunda here, or visit our Courses Page.


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Anima, soul, supreme meaning: Reading Carl Jung’s Red Book in 5 (easy) steps

 

This is Mindfunda's presentation for the Dream Weekend organized by the Dutch society for dreamers: Vereninging voor de Studie van Dromen (VSD) . Unfortunately influenza payed me an uninvited visit. I was not able to attend the weekend. Aad van Ouwerkerk, author and dream worker read my presentation to the visitors. I thank him for doing that.

We all have been there: in total darkness. Lost and alone, looking for a new way of life. A new way of being. Carl Jung began writing the Red Book on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Mindfunda looks at his search for the supreme meaning in five (easy) steps. Because this will be a long post I have divided it into five seperate chapters. By clicking on each part it will guide you to the step I am talking about.

This is a series of blogs about my proces of dreaming my way through the Red Book. I have divided it into five steps:

  1. Carl Jung
  2. Psychic Powers and dreams
  3. Animus/anima dreams
  4. God
  5. the Self.

This blog will talk about the first step: Carl Gustav Jung and what led up to writing the Red Book.

The anima will be everywhere. The anima is the soul. Carl Jung his first concept of the soul was the female principle. The soul he thought he had lost when he gave so much (maybe too much) of himself to science.

anima

 

The first time ever I saw the Red Book at the Jungian institute, I wanted it. I did not actually crave to read it, I just wanted to have it. to open it up from time to time, read, try to read the caligraphy written in German, enjoy the art.

Take a look for yourself if you haven’t had the chance yet (sponsored link to Amazon.com):

Red Book - Carl Jung - Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)
Red Book – Readers Edition (sponsored link to support this blog)

But at a given moment I mailed to some good friends of mine. People who are experienced dreamers. I invited them to read the Red Book with me and to incubate dreams and discuss them:

Jodine Grundy,
 Licensed Professional Counselor and former president of the International Association of Dreams.
Tim Schaming in training by Robert Moss who will make him realize that he already is a dream teacher.
Maria Cernutoproducer / researcher / writer/ makeup artist (and an extra ordinary gifted dreamer, who contributes to the site Dreams Cloud.
Linda Mastrangelo, Dream Worker, Researcher, Writer, Artist, and teacher .
Christian Gerike, Graduate student at Sonoma State University, Psychology Department, graduating on animals and dreaming.
Jenna Farr Ludwigdreamer, blogger on synchronicity and author.

This blog will talk about five (easy) steps:

  1. Carl Jung
  2. Telepathy and dreams
  3. Animus/anima dreams
  4. God
  5. the Self

But the anima will be everywhere. The anima is the soul. Carl Jung his first concept of the soul was the female principle. The soul he thought he had lost when he gave so much (maybe too much) of himself to science.

Carl Gustav Jung and the soul

Carl Jung (1875 -1961) was a psychiatrist living in Switzerland, married to one of the richest ladies of the country: Emma Rauschenbach. He was a charismatic man who was well liked by the ladies. One of those ladies, Tony Wolff, inspired the process described in the Red Book. She was Jung’s anima in the flesh.
The Red Book describes the process of Jung in search of his soul. His first concept of the anima was the soul. Later on he fine-tuned this process, making the anima part of the man’s psyche.

In 1913 Jung had a vision that lasted for about an hour. He saw blood. Red blood covering Europe. In his own words:

I saw a monstrous flood covering all the northern and low-lying lands between the North Sea and the Alps When it came up to Switzerland I saw that the mountains grew higher to protect the country. I realized that a frightful catastrophe was in progress. i saw the mighty yellow waves, the floating rubble of civilization, and the drowned bodies of uncounted thousands, Then the whole sea turned to blood. This vision lasted about one hour. I was perplexed and nauseated and ashamed of my weakness…

Two weeks past by then the visions recurred more vividly then before, and the blood was more emphasized. An inner voice spoke: “Look at it well, it is wholly real and it will be so, You can not doubt it”

Jung decided to stay with, and accept these visions. They later became part of a method called Active imagination. Stepping back into a dream or a vision and reliving the dream. Asking questions. Feeling feelings.
Many of us know about this part of the Red Book. Many of us see Jung as the shaman of the West because of this vision. Like a shaman he foresaw the horror facing many people. What do you think? Was it telepathy?

> Read on in part 2, about: Telepathy and dreams

Do you like this post? Feel free to share!

Please sign up for my YouTube channel to enjoy all the beautiful Mindfunda interviews with inspiring people. People like Jean Benedict Raffa, Anne Baring, Connie Kaplan, Ralph Metzner, Stanley Krippner and P.M.H. Atwater, Catherine Wikholm about her book the Buddha Pill and Justina Lasley about her book Wake Up to Your Dreams: Transform Your Relationships, Career, and Health While You Sleep! Evan Thompson about his book Waking Sleeping Being.

GRAB YOURSELF A FREE E-BOOK AND LEARN ALL ABOUT MUTUAL DREAMING USING THIS LINK
Join me on Facebook
Twitter @susannevandoorn